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WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 





3 4867 00650 2209 



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ClasfS of 1938 




WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL 



WALTHAM, 



MASSACHUSETTS 



®t)e Mitvox 

Graduation Issue 



Wal. Ref. 

EDUCATION 

1938 



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In the Long Run 



you and your friends will 
prize the portrait that looks 
like you — your truest self, 
free from stage effects and 
little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" pho- 
tography that PURDY suc- 
cess has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera 
that one cannot laugh at or 
cry over in later years. 

For the present pleasure and 
future pride protect your 
photographic self by having 
PURDY make the portraits 



Purdy 



ICy TREMONT STREET 



BOSTON 



Official photographer, Waltham High School 
Class of 1938 



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®fje iltrror 



1938 



Waltham High School 

Class Poem 

Charles W. Goodrich, Principal 

Class Statistics 

Class History 

Last Will and Testament 

Class Motto 

Class Prophecy 

Who's Who 



Ruth Moot\ 



Ray Adams 
Barbara Pride 

Arthur J. Clark 



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i NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY | 

| DAY DIVISION j 

J COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS | 

! Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for 

* ! the understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical ' 

| achievement. The purpose of this program is to give the student a libera! ' 

I and Cultural education and a vocational competence which fits him to enter | 

* some specific type of useful employment. J 

j COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION j 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the 

j principles of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING, ' 

| AND FINANCE, or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through ( 

| lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, motion pictures j 

I and talks by business men. j 

j COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING I 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional 

f courses in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL (WITH DIESEL, AERO- j 

| NAUTICAL, AND AIR CONDITIONING OPTIONS), ELECTRICAL, j 

CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING AD- j 

I MINISTRATION. Students select, at the beginning of the sophomore 

| year, the course in which they intend to specialize. 

| Co-operative Plan 



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The Co-operative Plan provides for a combination of practical in- j 

dustrial experience with classroom instruction. Upperclassmen earn a | 

| portion of their school expenses and make business contacts which prove , 
i valuable in later years. 

j Degrees Awarded 

* Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science j 

i - — I 

j EVENING DIVISION j 

| (For Men and Women) j 

) Providing complete courses of university grade, for high school gradu- I 

| ates who find it necessary to work during the day but wish to study for j 

| further advancement. jj 

j SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SCHOOL OF LAW \ 

j Programs in Accounting, Management. PRE-LEGAL DEPARTMENT I 

Law and Business, and in Engineer- Furnishes to high school graduates a 

| ing and Business, under instructors act- program of studies equivalent to the I 
= ually engaged in the fields in which two years of college wo»k required 

I they teach - for admission to the study of law. I 

| 73% of graduates hold executive posi- THE SCHOOL OF LAW j 

I tions in business. Preparation for the Prepares for the bar examination and ' 

I n a a e * aminatl °" s - . School grants for the practice of law. Case meth- i 

H. a .A. degree. Individual courses od of instruction. LL.B. degree con- I 

I available to special students. ferred. I 

| Graduates of Waltham Senior High School may be admitted without \ 

examinations if grades are satisfactory to the Department of Admissions- , 

| Catalogs or further information sent upon request j 

| NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY ! 

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS ! 



THE MIRROR, 1938 



Vol. XXIX 



Waltham, Mass. Graduation Issue, 1938 



No. 3 



= to fcolo atf 'ttoere, tfje mirror up to nature." 

Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 



Editorial Staff 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Arthur Power 



ASS'T. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Harris Greene 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Robert A. Nottenburg 

ASS'T, BUSINESS MANAGER 
Earl MacDougall 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 
Arthur Clark. 
ASS'T. ADVERTISING MANAGERS 
Ruth Merklee 
Eunice Ohlson 
Eunice Martin 



ART EDITOR 

Cynthia Kellogg 

ASS'T. ART EDITORS 

Beatrice Brennan 
Louis Lituri 

ALUMNI EDITOR 
Ethel Johnson 

ASS'T. ALUMNI EDITOR 
Cora Day 

SPORTS EDITORS 

Priscilla Clark 
Joseph Cardillo 
Edmund Harris 

PUBLICITY 
Barbara Pride 

STAFF SECRETARY 
Bertha Salvucci 



EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Winslow Bettinson 

ASS'T. EXCHANGE EDITORS 

Carmen Algeri 
Lorraine Goulding 

MUSIC EDITOR 
Eleanor Griffin 

ASS'T. MUSIC EDITOR 
Fred Kennedy 

HUMOR EDITORS 

Gloria Cataldo 
Justine Smith 
Edward Hitchcock 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER 
Forrest Daniels 



LITERARY COMMITTEE 

Kathleen Eaton, Chairman 
Genieve Joslyn, Assistant Chairman 



Carmen Algeri 
Elvira Algeri 
Shirley Bredemeyer 
Joseph Cardillo 
Margaret Castner 
Gloria Cataldo 
Betty Connelly 
Forrest Daniels 
Cora Day 
George Dorval 
Virginia Felt 
Roy Flett 
Miriam Gibbs 



Hope Goodell 
Lorraine Goulding 
Priscilla Hammond 
Lucille Hanna 
Carl Haron 
Edmund Harris 
Elsbeth Heinish 
Peggy Hicks 
Richard Hinchey 
Edward Hitchcock 
Anne Johnson 
John Lewis 
Robert Lyon 



Dora Merino 
Ruthie Moore 
Eleanor Morash 
Ann Pemberton 
Barbara Pride 
Mary Rhodes 
George Shedd 
Justine Smith 
Edward Stearns 
Anne Thomas 
Virginia Wanberg 
Barbara Weeks 
Doris Whitcomb 



FACULTY ADVISERS 
Literary Department Mr. Hood, Mr. Mosher, Miss Sweeney, Miss Viets 

Business Department Mr. Woodman 

Art Department Miss Burgess 

Arrangement, Make-up and Pressivork by the Pupils of the Waltham Trade School Printing Shop 



"n 




Waltham Senior High School 



THE IIEEOE, 1938 




CHARLES W. GOODRICH, Headmaster 



THE 

Ruth 

Along the road of life I strolled 

One day when all was fair, 

And far ahead I saw a gate 

Tall and stately there. 

And, as I neared the portal strong, 

I saw a lock of gold. 

The bars were silver, fair and fine, 

Dut strength was there untold. 

Now, as I looked upon this gate, 

Upon my ear came loud 

The tattoo of the horses' hoofs; 

The dust stirred in a cloud. 

A coach of beauty neared the place, 

The coach of wealth and glare, 

The occupant, Sir Richman, 

Announced by trumpets' blare. 

And as the fine-clad gentleman 

Alighted from within, 

He swaggered to the lovely gate, 

His entrance sought to win. 

But as this greedy man of wealth 

Just touched the lock of gold, 

It turned to lead, the bars to steel, 

The gems to iron cold. 

He struggled with the stubborn lock, 

And then it moved at last. 

The gate swung out just wide enough 

To let the man crowd past. 

But! What was this? He could not see! 

The fog was thick and chill. 

The path was rocky, deep with mud, 

The trees were bare and still. 

He faltered, stumbled blindly on, 

Through mists of sin and greed; 

Great cliffs of cold and crumbling rock 

His journey did impede. 

But as in fog and barren waste 

His figure once was lost. 

I thought, this man's great earthly gains, 

How much they really cost. 

When sll at last should be serene 

And the way should gleam with light 

Instead of fog and rocky cliffs 

How sad this "rich" man's plight. 

Then, as I pondered on the thought, 

A step upon the road 



GATE 

Moore 

Brought to my sight an aged man. 

Upon his back a load 

That could be labeled "Worldly Cares.' 

But something as he neared 

Called on me then to look at him. 

'Neath shaggy brown appeared 

A pair of soft, blue, kindly eyes. 

Good eyes! They had not seen defeat. 

Although the road was rough and long 

He had not faltering feet. 

As then he touched the nearby gate, 

A wonder to behold ! 

His load had vanished in the air, 

He did not seem so old. 

And as the gate swung open wide, 

His face he lifted high. 

His wrinkled hands reached forward 

As he breathed a welcome sigh. 

Beyond the gate a garden fair 

Stretched out along the way. 

A place of beauty unsurpassed 

Unseen for many a day. 

The grass lay green upon the lea, 

The trees were leaved and cool. 

For this man, lo, an Eden there 

He found beside the pool — 

Such contrasts find we in this life: 

Some go the way alone, 

Blinded to the better things 

That make life good, and moan 

Because at last their happiness 

Of lasting peace is gone. 

They never see the beauties 

Of the trees, the birds, the dawn. 

For them there is but fog ahead. 

Just rocks and fog, and mire, 

Because upon this earth they have 

A greedy, vain desire. 

The poor, old man with worldly cares 

Had found his Eden — Why? 

Because of little kindnesses 

He did as he passed by. 

To fellowmen along the way 

He gave the best he could. 

Kindness, acts of service, 

And a soul of simple good. 



THE IIRROR, 1938 



History of Class of 1938 



In this Class History I wish it were in my 
power to do somewhat as the composer Haydn 
did when he composed his surprise symphony. 
Knowing that some people are apt to fall asleep 
in the course of a concert, he put together his 
surprise symphony, in the middle of which there 
occurred a loud crash, destined to startle the most 
drowsy to attention. Recognizing the somnolent 
effects of a class history, I would that I could in- 
sert something of the same type in my discourse. 

Because of the construction of new wings on 
our temple of learning, our entrance to high 
school was delayed until October. In spite of 
our eagerness to launch upon a new career, I am 
afraid that the delay did not cause any heartache 
among the members of our class. Fascinating in- 
deed is the entrance into a new life, and such 
was our entrance into high school. New faces, 
new teachers, and new methods were all regarded 
with an ill-concealed wonder. Afternoon sessions 
were none too enjoyable, but with December came 
the return to the one-session plan and again the 
necessity of early rising. On our return, to 
school, we found that a large, new modern lunch- 
room had been installed. For a nominal sum 
each day, the drudgery of carrying a lunch to 
school could be avoided. But the advent of a 
lunchroom brought about new dangers. Woe 
betide the unlucky person who happened to be 
go : ng in the wrong direction when the lunch 
bell rang. The horde of hungry students poured 
from the various classrooms, and it was every 
man for himself as the ravenous crowd milled 
toward their favorite tables. Continuous practice, 
however, skilled one in the finesse of ducking and 
dodgmg till a favorable position in the line was 
obtained. 

'Twas at this stage of the game that we en- 
countered the need for leaders if we were to be 
an up and-coming class, and as a result we elect- 
ed Robert Nims, President; Ray Adams, Vice- 
Prcs : dent; Donald Harvey, Secretary-Treasurer; 
and, in view of future pecuniary resources, se- 



lected William Ruffin as our Auditor. Fortified 
now by guidance, we set about making plans for 
our Sophomore Hop. Under the direction of a very 
capable committee, plans were made, and a prom- 
inent local orchestra engaged. Arrangements were 
smoothly carried through, and the dance was a 
complete success right down to the last piece of 
cake and the last plate of ice cream. Everyone en 
joyed himself to the full, and, believe it or not, 
we were able to record the affair in black ink. 

While it is true that our entrance into high 
school did not send Coach Jack Leary into any 
sort of ecstasies, it is equally true that some of 
our boys did show promise as future athletes. We 
were well represented among the candidates foi 
the various athletic teams. 

Being an unusually bright and intelligent group 
(Thank you, thank you), we entered wholeheart- 
edly into the literary and scholarly side of school 
life and contributed a few gems to the school 
mag, pardon me, school magazine. Full of school 
spirit, however, we declined offers from Hearst 
and other publications and threw ourselves into 
(he job of making Waltham High a bigger, bet- 
ter, and finer school. The truth will out, and it 
must be admitted that the advent of spring 
brought a strange sluggishness into the blood of 
come of our dreamier members, while also bring- 
ing slight censure from our teachers who, it is 
said, know what is best for us. Time passed 
however, and June brought a well-earned and ap- 
prcc'ated vacation, when we bade adieu for the 
time being to all things suggestive of school life. 
Time: Early fall, and destiny's tot, the Class 
of "38", embarked on its Junior Year. Well- 
rested after a summer of pleasure and loafing 
(the two words are synonymous in my vocabu- 
lary), we threw ourselves with eagerness into the 
task at hand. My, my, how we had grown, and 
this was evidenced by our contributions to the 
gladiators of the gridiron, Waltham's invincible 
(almost) football team. Taking stock, we 
found that one or two of our members had 




THE MIRROR, 1938 



dropped by the wayside. But that is the way of 
life, and we shall ever have the survival of the 
fittest (sigh-sigh). Again casting our non-par- 
tisan votes, we elected Edmund Harris, President; 
Forrest Daniels, Vice-President; William Stevens, 
Secretary-Treasurer; and William Ruffin, Auditor. 

The football team was very successful through- 
out the season, but even as Napoleon had his 
Waterloo, and Anthony, his Cleopatra, so did 
Waltham have Brockton. However, hats off to 
a hard-working, deserving team. 

This year, too, we greeted our new principal, 
Mr. Charles W. Goodrich, and bade farewell and 
good luck to that grand personage, Mr. Burke. 
Mr. George L. Ward was selected as our new sub- 
master and became a familiar figure to those who 
frequented the office. 

Another source of joy this year was our new 
and modern gymnasium, recognized as one of the 
finest in the State. Served as a side dish and re- 
ceived with high glee, were the new locker rooms 
and showers. It would have been difficult to jolt 
either Mr. Brinn or Mr. Leary from their satis- 
faction at this time. 

The Christmas holidays came and fell into ob- 
livion and the year 1937 was nursed into being. . . 

This year was marked by unusual success in 
both hockey and basketball. Headed by Art 
Shaughnessy, the hockey team swept through a 
one-defeat season to enter the semi-finals for the 
championship of the Bay State Hockey League. 
Three thrilling games were played before Wal- 
tham could claim supremacy over Framingham, 
but the team came through like the champions 
they proved to be, and in the finals defeated 
Wellesley. 

Resumption of basketball as a school sport 
after a lapse of twelve years proved very success- 
ful as the team went on to tie for leadership in 
the Suburban League. 

Again spring came on us, as it has an unfailing 
habit of doing, and the old urge to dash willy- 
nilly 'mongst the birds, bees, trees, and stuff 
brought to grief a few spring members of our 



class, who found, to their dismay, that the school 
authorities have definite ideas on school attend- 
ance. I am proud to say, however, that there 
were but a few of us who were thus affected by 
the wanderlust. 

And now it became time to think of that classic 
event, the Junior Prom. Accordingly, we selected 
as our chairman that little man with the big in- 
fluence, Joseph Cardillo. The dance was held in 
the school gymnasium, which was attractively 
decorated by the dance committee. Placed in a 
prominent position was a large banner done in 
the class colors and bearing the class motto. 
Semper Superare. Dancing to the strains of a 
popular orchestra, the carefree throng enjoyed 
themselves no end. And to the credit of the 
faculty chaperons it can be said that they en- 
tered heartily into the festive mood and showed 
the students a few new tricks to be executed on 
the dance floor. Plans ran so smoothly, with 
never a flaw, that the close of the evening brought 
many expressions of regret. Several members of 
the track team must certainly have had twinges 
of conscience, though, as the team was scheduled 
to appear at the State Meet to be held the next 
day. We caution Coach Brinn to keep a care- 
ful watch on dates in the future. 

'Twas at this time that our upperclassmen, the 
seniors, were preparing to leave us. It was now 
our turn to lord it over the unfortunate class fol- 
lowing us. Notwithstanding, we felt genuine re- 
gret at the parting with the Senior Class. Soon 
again summer was on us, and we wearily set down 
our pencils, pens, and books to indulge in our 
two-months' vacation. 

As our Senior year rolled 'round, fall football 
practice began before the regular school sessions. 
This accounted for the presence of the husky 
boys seen about the school for the two weeks 
preceding the regular opening. Believe it or not, 
it is true that most students were not loath to 
begin school this year. Well versed now in the 
ways of high-school life, we fell into the routinc 
with little or no ado. While the boys labored at 
football, the athletically-inclined girls of the 



THE MIRROR, 1938 



school were to be found whiling away their time 
at field hockey. This proved to be a very dis- 
tracting influence on the boys because no one can 
deny that our high school misses, dressed as they 
were, cut very attractive pictures tripping after an 
elusive ball. 

The coach of the football team would be will- 
ing to voice himself at some length, in fact, as to 
the distracting influence of the weaker sex. 

Feeling the ever-present need for leaders, we 
chose Edmund Harris, President; Leonard Erick- 
son, Vice-President; Marie Carlson, Secretary- 
Treasurer; and Arthur Clarke, Class Auditor. 

In December the Dramatic Club presented its 
annual play, entitled Growing Pains. A hard- 
working cast and very capable coaching combined 
to make it truly successful. 

That not-soon-to-be-forgotten epoch, the Sen- 
ior Dance, was now in the offing; accordingly 
the class set about making its plans. A capable 
committee worked tirelessly, and on January 8th, 
1938, a carefree Senior Class made its way to the 
gym. A local dance orchestra really "swung out" 
as the "Big Apple", "Shag", and other current 
dance favorites were performed on the floor. It 
was a successful evening, culminated by many of 
those attending in meetings at various night 
clubs in Boston. 

Under Editor-in-chief Arthur Power, the "Mir- 
ror" had one of the most satisfactory years on 
record, A new department was created under the 
direction of Forrest "Pro" Daniels, who took the 
title of Photography Editor. "Pro", a well- 
known figure about the school, is a very efficient 
amateur candid-camera photographer, and some 
of the snaps on record prove his capability and 
(hat of his staff. Another praiseworthy improve- 
ment was the remodelling of the humor depart- 
ment, which became a really humorous section. 

We have with us this year a few holdovers 
from last year's class. They were immediately 
absorbed in our activities and proved themselves 
capable and efficient in furthering class projects. 

Dramatic talent was brought to light as the 
Senior Play was presented. Working faithfully 
under the direction of the Coach, Miss Rand, the 



play The Whole Town's Talking, was presented 
in a masterful manner. The antics of that heart- 
breaking Lothario, Chester Binney, will not be 
forgotten soon. Robert Montgomery, look to 
your laurels ! 

Truly a versatile class, we presented under the 
direction of Mr. Crawford, a comic operetta, The 
Royal Vagabond, comprising a cast of about one 
hundred. Three performances were given on suc- 
cessive nights, capacity crowds voicing their ap- 
proval of a fine piece of showmanship. 

The hockey and basketball teams terminated 
their seasons, and the first team members received 
their sweaters. Both sports were left with a val- 
uable nucleus for next year. 

We must not forget our fine Waltham High 
School Band which has provided us with such 
stirring music at various times throughout the 
year, notably during the football season. As 
usual it has kept up its fine grade of work. 

With graduation drawing near, the Seniors 
now found it fitting and proper that they should 
have their pictures. Accordingly, we elected 
Leonard Erickson Chairman of a committee to 
interview and obtain samples from various pho- 
tographers. The general topic of conversation 
for the following three weeks was concerned with 
whether or not pictures had been taken, proofs 
seen, or prints received. Teachers were on the 
verge of despair as classrooms took on the ap- 
pearance of art galleries. 

New worries were brought to light as the third 
quarter terminated, and many who had up until 
this point loafed cheerfully along, now began to 
dash hither and thither with wild murmurings 
on their lips of points and units. For the most 
part, we braved the crucial period very well and 
became absorbed in the light tasks of voting for 
Who's Who, and other sundry pleasant duties. — 
The year draws to a close. 

We, the Class of 1938, have made our High 
School History, and now turn to bigger things. 
Some of us go on to schools of higher learning, 
some of us set out to make names for ourselves 
in the world, but in whatever direction we travel, 
let us continue to make history. 

Ray Adams. 



THE MIEKOE, 1938 



Last Will Testament of The Class of 1938 



To Whom It May Concern: 

We, the class of 1938, of the Waltham Senior 
High School, being of sound mind and memory, 
in spite of numerous doubts that our faculty may 
have to the contrary, and of lawful age to exer- 
cise our own free will, although our elders do 
not entertain these sentiments, and after pay- 
ment of our just debts and parting expenses 
(most of which were acquired in the cafeteria) 
do devise and bequeath all the rest, residue, and 
remainder of our estate as follows: 

To the class of '39 we make the proud bequest 
of five new rooms so that the growing family, 
which we now leave, may find facilities more con- 
venient in the future. Accompanying our be- 
quest is a warning to those who so dexterously 
use their jackknives on public property. 

To the class of 1940 we leave a host of foot- 
steps firmly impressed in the familiar corridors 
of our alma mater into which they may fall as 
they climb toward those noble heights of Seniority. 
Also we leave to them our many privileges with 
the hope that they will use them wisely. 

To Mr. Goodrich, our headmaster and foster 
parent, we leave boundless appreciation for his 
wise counsel and service, and gratitude for his 
friendly understanding and discretion. 

To Mr. Ward, our submaster, we leave a con- 
tract from the producers of Shakespearian plays, 
so that his talent for portraying certain characters 
(we have in mind a particular role in Macbeth) 
will not be lost to his future English classes. 

To Miss Rand, as a reward for her untiring 
efforts in coaching the Senior plays, we bequeath 
a future of ideal casts, none of whom will be 
absent or tardy, whose voices will never fail them 
at the crucial moment, and whose parts will be 
learned to perfection at the appointed time. 

To Mr. Gallagher we leave one motion-picture 
machine complete, so that he may accompany his 
endless collection of ancient and gruesome myths 



with moving pictures as he relates them to shud 
dering girls and heartless boys. 

To Mr. Lees, who assists in turning out those 
efficient secretaries and business men, we leave a 
much needed new basket, which will rest peace- 
fully on his desk to hold all those conscientiously 
prepared papers which we feel sure will receive 
remarkably high grades. 

To Miss Dean we bequeath a copy of that 
deeply reverenced book of Job, for after careful 
observation, general agreement, and experience, 
which is the best teacher of all, we proclaim her 
most comparable to that virtuous soul in her 
possession of patience. 

To that gentleman who has acquired a reputa- 
tion for his generosity, Mr. Hodge, we leave an 
orchard of those unusually large luscious apples 
bearing the appropriate name of "Delicious," so 
iiiat he may continue to lighten the burdens of 
history by his frequent gifts of "The Big Apple." 

To Miss Morse, our amiable young faculty 
member who so capably manages our cafeteria, 
we leave a new cook book with appetizing sug- 
gestions for two, so that when she takes over 
that new position she will continue to be as 
efficient in the culinary art. Also, we wish those 
dishes to be every bit as charming to that certain 
lucky person as our attractive teacher is now. 

To Mr. Hood, for use in those oral composi- 
tion programs for which room 014 has become 
renowned, we leave one victrola and apparatus 
for making recordings of those fluently presented 
orations. However, since the machine is devised 
for this purpose, no sounds from the quaking of 
knees or chattering of teeth will register. 

Arthur Power, Bob Nottenburg, and Cynthia 
Kellogg, who have so graciously given of their 
time, effort, and talent for the benefit of our 
school magazine "The Mirror," bequeath their 



HE MIRROR, IOCS 



ability to the Junior staff members, such as Harris 
Greene, Earl MacDougall, and Justine Smith, 
who have been such capable assistants during the 
past year. 

Betsey Nutting bequeathes her reputation for 
looking as neat as a pin, as chic as a model, and 
as charming as a hostess to Lorraine Goulding. 

Two alarm clocks recently lent by the school 
to Helen Noonan and Lester MacArthur along 
with the suggestion that school begins at eight 
o'clock, we now leave to William Gorgone and 
Alan Davis in the hope that they will bear this 
fact in mind. 

Arthur J. T. Clark leaves his propensity for 
being here, there, and everywhere for the pur- 
pose of haunting certain human beings at the 
most inopportune moments to any Junior who 
possesses a similar nature, and his efficiency as 
number-one man for getting advertisements we 
leave to Ruth Merklee. 



Las'., but most important to those classes who 
so hale to see us depart, v/e leave a cafeteria free 
from the echoes of "Who'll lend me a nickel?", 
free from the chaos caused by us, especially on 
Wednesdays, and free from the familiar voices 
and figures of the class of '38. 

And, lastly, we do hereby nominate and ap- 
point Miss Woodward, Mr. Mosher, and Miss 
Scottron to be co-executors of this our last will 
and testament. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our 
hand and seal this eighth day of June in the year 
of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
thirty-eight as a body commonwealth. 

We, the class of '38, do make this codicil to 
our will and hereby appoint Miss Betsey Nutting, 
who shall present the gifts to those who have 
been deemed worthy of these honors. 

Barbara Pride. '38. 



THE IIRROE, 1938 



Class Prophecy 



Science has its compensations. Through the 
efforts and achievements of Professor Einstein 
and his accomplished pupils, Richard Ford, Walter 
Eberhard, John Katsogianas, and Ed. Stearns, we 
have before us a television apparatus which oper- 
ates on the same idea as Munchausen's magic 
carpet. (You all remember the Baron no doubt.) 

Out of oblivion by a means far exceeding my 
comprehension, contemporary events can be 
brought before us on the world's mammoth 
screen. Thus, through our renowned observatory 
which sees all and knows all, located on one of 
Greater Boston's principal vantage points, Pros- 
pect Hill, we are able, that is, Professor Arthur 
Shaughnessy of the Harvard and Oxford Observ- 
atories and I, to focus its penetrating cosmic rays 
over these United States and discover what our 
former classmates are doing. As we turn our 
machine around, Wayland and Lincoln are the 
first busy little communities to come into our 
vision. In Wayland we see a large billboard with 
a beautiful and alluring girl traced upon it, a 
splendidly executed picture which is the work of 
Dwight Berry. By reading its printed section we 
find it is Lady Mia Cole, now the owner of the 
world's largest cosmetic center located in Way- 
land. Lady Mia, as we know her, has brought 
upon the market her new non-cake soap powder. 
It seems the girls always wanted something of 
this type as half the time the powder took the 
place of soap. 

The next thing that catches our eye as we turn 
the television ray is a huge sign "Barbara Glass 
& Co., Makers of Hooks and Eyes." It seems 
that in her school days she did quite a bit of 
hooking and was noted for making eyes. She 
therefore found it advisable to stay in the occu- 
pation in which she was best experienced. We 
notice, with faint smiles on our countenances, that 
she too has chosen a rural location for her enter- 
prise. Lincoln always was her favorite President. 

Professor Art Shaughnessy, not being able to 
participate in any sports by now because of lum- 



bago and increased poundage but being an ardent 
lover of baseball, suggests to me that we try to 
locate a game by means of our machine. So now 
we flip the dial and find some youngsters playing 
at the site of the old city dump. 

Look! It is evidently the outstanding game 
of the season; on the field are the fighting Rose- 
buds coached by Slugger Richard Hinchey. While 
at bat are the Batty Batsters coached by Basher 
Batstone — Alan to us when he was the French- 
man in "The Whole Town's Talking." 

But wait! Our view is obstructed by Bob Lyon 
with Virginia Eaton, two ardent sport fans who 
have plenty of money from the Social Security and 
Unemployment Compensation. 

Being unable to see with the naked eye, we 
look around the park by means of our apparatus 
and perceive several old spinsters, including Dot 
Kelly, Etta Viles, Harriet Linder, Frances Hodge, 
Marjorie Alexander, and Betty Reidt, still hero 
worshipping as they did in school days. 

Ah ! But more of that later. Our vision is 
now clear. There's a foul ! It konks Benny 
Ristuccia on the nut and although exasperated 
with pain, he seizes the opportunity to fall in the 
arms of Alice Rowe, who had been eyeing his 
automobile most of the afternoon. 

What's this! The game is being called. It 
seems that they had but one ball, and that was 
completely ruined when it struck the cranium of 
Ristuccia. 

"By George!" exclaims Shocks, nearly shiver- 
ing my timbers at the same time. "Isn't it about 
time for the opera? You know Irene Kallow is 
another Schumann-Heink at the Boston Opera 
House. Let's close up the machine and hop in 
our Kyte Quack-O-Bus made by Joseph Kyte, 
king of the quacks." 

Wasting about five minutes trying to bring 
droopy Jimmie Ferro, our chauffeur, out of a 
coma, we finally start on our way. Coming down 
Mele Hill, so called because of the big fish plant 
owned by John Mele, located near there, we stop 




THE MIRROR, 1938 



to pick up Joe Maguire, Dick Rr.nkin, Kenneth 
Perry, Don Johnston, Robert Elvin Hoffses, 
Harold Jensen, and Norman Johansen, a crew of 
W. P. A. foremen who are exhausted from their 
daily chores. On the way we pass Cliff Larson's 
professional basketball college where Cliff is in- 
structing Leonard Erickson, Jr., to shoot, dribble, 
and feint. 

Robert G. LeBlanc's ginger ale emporium is 
across the street. Marge Cox is the star of his 
floor show, and Oliver Coffin is master of cere- 
monies. Marge is also doing some short-story 
writing on the side for the Ladies' Home Journal 
— "Just a Westerner"! Other members of her 
chorus are Etta Nies, Lucille Hannah, Elaine 
Gordon, Cynthia Kellogg, and the leading lady, 
Bettie Fisher. 

The next thing we pass is the new high school, 
constructed by MacArthur, McPherson, Mac- 
Arthur & Co. Being Scotch, they made it an 
open air affair, thereby doing away with expense 
of putting a roof on it. It is commemoration 
day, and all the big officials are here. First we 
see Robert Nims, who has given up grand opera 
to become supervisor of music in Waltham. 
What's this we observe! Why it's none other 
than Harry Patrick Trainor (Democrat), now 
mayor of Waltham, and his three secretaries, 
Hazel McDonald, Phyllis McDonald, and Eleanor 
McDonald, that cute brunette now keeping com- 
pany with Lakeview William Hill, her play-boy 
friend. Glancing around, we see standing doing 
nothing as usual, councillors Ray Adams, John 
Leslie Anderson John Arrigo, Fred Smith, Loring 
Berggren, and John Butler, now on his last legs 
as a result of guzzling a bottle of Recka's new 
spirited milk, chief competitor of Chapin's Qui- 
nine milk. 

"Come on! Come on!" says Shocks, trying to 
drag me away. "Curtain rises in five minutes." 

The curtain had just risen as we arrived, and 
there stood Don Harvey and Ruth Whitehouse. 

The music starts slowly and sweetly. Ruth 
speaks, and instantaneously on rushes Irene 
Kallow, Don's stage wire. "Be jabers!" says 
Don; "here comes me wife." Irene, white 



to the gills, draws from her bag a six-shooter. 
She levels it at the heart of Harvey and slowly 
but carefully pulls the trigger. Harvey and 
Whitehouse are now but a couple of gum 
drops. But what a couple! Just as Irene fires, 
the curtain falls. "Return next week", says Bob 
O'Connell, the demon announcer, "and see what 
happened when Irene pulled the trigger. This 
program has been brought to you through the 
courtesy of Porretti, Parrello, & Peridier, Alliter- 
ative Building & Wrecking Co., Inc." 

O'Connell leaves the stage, and the people 
start filing out. Shaughnessy decides to stay 
awhile as he feels a little weak from the "stogie" 
he smoked before we entered the theatre. While 
sitting there we see Madeline Joan Dicks, cute- 
thing, trailed by the seven dwarfs, Geo. Wyman, 
— Bashful, Charles Mignosa — Doc, Paul Tracy — 
Dopey, Art Thibeault — Sneezy, Bob A. LeBlanc — 
Sleepy, Carl Haron — Grumpy, Al Schwotzer — 
Happy. Next Carline Wheaton and Eileen Mor- 
ris escorted by Dick Dow and Tana Rizzo came 
into our view. Tana is now a tailor who mends 
everything but broken hearts. 

Well! Well! Up comes Benny Cappadona, 
who has just written a new song, "I'm a Bad 
Egg. Don't Drop Me." With him is his partner, 
Joe Cardillo, the originator of the new tango, 
The Big Olive. The poor lads had been to every 
theatre in the country to sell their combined acts 
but are now giving free exhibitions at the Wal- 
dorf, where their tin cups keep them in dough- 
nuts and coffee. 

Finally Shocks gets his wind, and we are off 
again. On the way out we pass the usherettes' 
roll call. Among them are Lillian Borger. 
Dorothy Brady, Mona Breen, Doris Bomengen, 
Edna Dolber, Carolyn Davis, and Chief Usher- 
ette Matilda Ginsberg. 

It's some job to get Shaughnessy out of 
there after he catches sight of the gals, but with 
the help of two janitoresses, Lena Fish and Bar- 
bara Felt, we finally throw him into the street. 

Being a little hungry as we arrive at our Quack- 
O-Plane, we decide to grab a bite to eat. Ferro 
suggests Statkus's Dirty Spoon in Stoughton, but 



THE MIREOR, 1938 



being unusually hungry, we hop over to Moon- 
shine Daddona's new business-place called the 
"Counterfeit." Believing it to be a peculiar 
name, we ask why he called it such. "Well," 
says he, "I used to call it the Polka Dot, but 
business wasn't so good and I was 'on the spot' 
so now I call it the 'Counterfeit', and nobody 
can pass it." Since George is unable to lead us 
to our table, his two bouncers, Kermit Welton 
and Peter Tamulewicz, help him over to it. When 
we are finally seated, Ted Schofield, the waiter, 
brings a menu for each of us. Shaughnessy turns 
his away and says, "Bring me noodle soup, then 
bring me stewed meat and spinach, and lastly 
bring me — bring me applesauce." "Shaugh- 
nessy!" says I amazed, "Why you know the en- 
tire menu by heart!" 

"Nonsense! By heart!" muttered Shaugh- 
nessy. "I see the table cloth, don't I?" 

While waiting for our dinner we order pink 
lemonade from the singing waiter who is none 
other than Theodore Percival Goguen. But be- 
fore our drinks are ready, on comes the stage 
show. Shaughnessy makes a dash for the front 
seat, as usual. The chorus consisting of Muriel 
Kehoe, Alice McKinley, Audrey Keith, Kathleen 
Kern, Natalie Keyes, Marion Macphee, Eva 
Katon, Amy Franks, and Dorothea Gay is a smash 
hit, especially with Shocks. Suddenly there is a 
loud applause, and Barbara Filson makes her en- 
trance. She appears in the role of a Grecian 
goddess and will do the dance of the "One- 
legged Goose" from the play "The Goose is 
Cooked." 

As the act ends, two cigarette girls seeing 
Shaughnessy rush over to make a sale. They are 
Dot Woodward and Flo Young. As I purchase 
a package, Shaughnessy sighs and forlornly de- 
clares that he couldn't find enough milk bottles 
to cash before he left home this morning. 

The next act on the program is an acrobatic 
performance by Barbara Bent, Florence Castellano, 
Ginnie St. Pierre, and Mary Palumbo who weave 
themselves into such intricate positions that it is 
necessary to call on George Ellis, national boy 
scout leader, to disentangle them. 



The entertainment closes with a selection by 
Annie Maragliano. Her number is "The Witches' 
Dream" written by the five witches, Arline 
Adams, Joan Gilbert, Ruth Burnham, Barbara 
Clarke, and Helen Noonan, for the Rosenburg 
Production, "The Murder of John Sears." 

In the meantime our dinner has been served 
and after using most of our energy to devour it, 
we finally are on our way again. As we walk 
down to our car, we are stopped by James Ferelli, 
now a parson. He extends his blessings to me 
knowing that Shaughnessy doesn't need them and 
tells us to beware of vamps. 

Right before us spring up those big-eyed 
thirty-eighters, Priscilla Clark, Helen Carter, Al- 
dea Cunniffe, Thelma Burns, Ruth Hanselpacker, 
and Estelle Deacon, still searching for the end of 
the rainbow — whatever it may be. Shocks 
pushes me into a doorway where we are greeted 
by Carmen Algeri, a mysterious fortune teller. 
She invites us to sit down and proceeds to tell 
us what is to happen and what is happening at 
the present time. She gazes into a crystal ball 
and goes into a trance. "What a time to go into 
a trance," whispers Shocks. 

But wait; she speaks. "Allah — Allah — en- 
lightens me. Ah! Now it comes — it comes." 

"About time something came." Shocks still 
talking. I see the motored highways, the 
aged buildings, the open fields fading into the 
drifting clouds, the heavenly azure, and now 
in their places slowly drooping in the light 
of the dazzling rays of melting sun, I see 
modernized landscapes, the blue sky filled with 
droning planes, old but familiar faces and young, 
sturdy bodies crowding the busy thoroughfares. 
It is the year 1958. 

I see fields — large fields. Now the veil is 
lifting and in one field, I see the structural 
buildings filled with bedridden patients. I hear 
the anguished moans of pain-racked bodies. I 
inhale the familiar odor of etherized objects. It 
is the field of medicine, and there in its midst, 
in the very throes of skilled manipulations and 
trying duty, are Doctors Edmund Harris, Bob 
Higgins, and Morris Bordenca, the half-crazed 



THE MIRROR, 1938 



doctor who, by the way, learned the profession 
by the wielding of a razor, (take a look at the 
necks of his customers) and Warren Clark being 
assisted by nurses Eleanor Blanchard, Anne Can- 
nistraro, Erna Brennen, Kathleen Eaton, Arlene 
Fawson, Olive Collins, and Pearl Walsh. 

But now that field is fading, and into the gaze 
of the crystal ball comes another. Out of it 
buildings are sprouting, vehicles scatter to and 
fro, and I am in the heart of a great city. The 
scene shifts, and I am brought into the interior 
of those buildings and see, wrapped in the ardor 
of their work, Margaret Castner, Marie Carlson, 
Mary Giamo, Anita Grenier, Edith Helgeson ; and 
Josephine Scafidi, all successful secretaries and 
clerks in the office of the H. F. U. Law Firm, 
with Forrest Daniels, President, and his assistants, 
"Grafty" Strum, "Spitter" McQuiston, and Mick- 
ey "Shyster" Russo. 

The present case in this crooked little enter- 
prise the boys have formed is against Abe 
Kennen and Winslow Bettinson, who are alleged 
to have stolen some pussy willows from the home 
of a wealthy old skinflint, Marie Mogan. The 
case has already been thrown out of the district 
court by Louis Eimer, the presiding judge and 
wealthy ice cream vender. They are out to get 
money, however, and are determined to bring the 
case to the Supreme Court with Judges Gordon 
Anderson, Vincent Breen, Sydney Canter, Frank 
Clark, Royal Curran, Bob Derbyshire, Albert Di 
Gregory, Paul Benson, and Chief Justice Bernie 
Fine. All are appointees of President Fofo 
Salamone. Without a doubt if there is any way 
of collecting damages, the H. F. U.'s will find it. 

On the way out we are met by head cashier 
Esther Demeo. "Fifty cents, please," is the re- 
quest. "Give her a buck", says Shaughnessy, 
"and then we'll leave." Stepping outside we hear 
the shrill sound of the trumpets. It is a circus 
parade! Marching down the street paced by 
Babe Donahue is the Aucoin Brothers' circus 
band. In the first flank is little Art Power play- 
ing the sweet potato, John Dahlin and his foosie 



horn, and Austin Dougherty and Don McCaul 
tooting away on the plunger. Other members 
we recognize are Fran Kneeland, Tony Lopez, 
Ralph Kelley, Clifford Harrington, Elroy Hill, 
and the drummer Fran Rowell still pounding 
away. Fran and Art take time out to sing the 
memorable little hockey bus duet "You'll Never 
Get to Heaven on Roller Skates." 

Riding on the back of a trained panther is 
" John Sloane. The panther (an over-grown cat) 
was trained after many long hours by Lawrence 
Selig, Art Schebeci, Everett Smith, Joe Madden, 
and Ray Morreale at the farm of Ohnemus & 
Richardson according to the poster borne by 
Robert A. Nottenburg, business manager of the 
circus. 

Then come the clowns, Norman Burdett as 
Popeye, Ed Whitney as Wimpy, Sebastian Rigoli 
as Castor Oil, Louise Milley as Olive Oyl, and 
Ed Spencer the Goon. The horrors are next in 
the parade with Carl Paladino, George Pothier, 
Herbert Wheeler, and Harry Sheldon playing the 
part to perfection. Harry is carrying two weird- 
looking shell-pink dahlias, horrible products of a 
Vernon Street garden. 

Glancing along the long line of performers we 
perceive the trim cowgirls. Riding on the backs 
of truck horses are Cora Sanderson, Toots Sal- 
vucci, Snooky Marlinska, Princess Dube, Trixie 
Beninati, and Marjorie Budreau who rode Time 
Wasted in the Kentucky Derby. 

"That should be a good show," remarked 
Shaughnessy. "Let's hop back to the machine and 
save YOUR money." 

Upon returning to our marvel of television we 
focus the rays on Jimmie Hayes' Arena located in 
the spacious grounds of Lakeview. Throngs are 
busting in on Chet Hill, doorkeeper, and Joe 
Gullotti, police officer. 

With our machine we peruse the inside of the 
arena where in the midst of all excitement we 
find Pearl Crevoshay, extraordinary woman athlete 
and juggler. Her feats amaze even the oldest 
Lake Street inhabitants. 



\ 




THE MIKEOE, 1938 



Her close competitor as an exhibitionist is 
Dick Handrahan, the circus strong man, who ob- 
tained his strength by eating the left-overs at the 
high school cafeteria. What a Man! 

As Leo Gallitano barks out the first major 
event, which is the Cannon act in which John 
Corcoran is shot from the cannon, the circus band 
plays the new song hit, "Shot at Sunrise in the 
Fading Moonlight." 

As this act drew to a close and other acts be- 
came as unbearable as some of Gertrude Cotton's 
jokes, the crowd begins to leave. As they file 
out they pass a peanut stand where Charlotte 
Hadley is handling the nuts. Some of those 
standing around (not necessarily nuts) are Fran- 
ces Matthews, Mary Umbrello, Doris Brennen, 
Louise LeCain, and Emily Gibbs. In their at- 
tempt to purchase some peanuts they find that a 
kind-hearted old man had bought the stand and 
given the peanuts to the Big Circus Ape. He 
didn't know the good-looking performer was 
Dorothy Rafuse in disguise. (No, the kind- 
hearted old man wasn't Shaughnessy.) 

Having received ample enjoyment from the 
circus, we train our rays on the National Broad- 
casting Company's new studio building construct- 
ed by Carmelo Mezzarini. You perhaps can pic- 
ture what a masterpiece it was judging by the 
physics papers he used to hand in. 

Anxious to see some of our beautiful class- 
mates, we strain our television rays on one of the 
studios where the Mulrean Pretzel Company, 
with the trade slogan "Our business is crooked, 
but our policy is straight," is located. This 
prosperous little concern is putting on a beauty 
show. And what a show ! Some of the truly 
brilliant beauties taking part are Marg. Goodrich, 
Marion Margolis, Esther McGowan, Olive Foley, 
Marjorie Wetherbee, Marjorie Jacob, and Dorothy 
Happeny. 

The judges are Carl Adams, Ed Hitchcock, Ed 
Daley, Jimmie Carney, and Bill Dion, the oil 
magnate. These judges, all Ph.D. men in math- 
ematics, were chosen because of their experience 
in the study of figures. 



After feasting our eyes without the aid of 
"Murine" we jump to the next studio where our 
news commentator, Barbara Louise Pride, brings 
the latest news on the 1958 superstreamlined 
Swing Contest between Betty E. Stevens, cham- 
pion of the West End, and Alice Gertie Christie 
(Queen of Lakeview Swing) . 

The judge of this specialty is Adeline "Beans" 
Campbell, who claims to be Benny Goodman's 
cousin. 

There is a guest speaker tonight on the news 
program. It is Donald Floyd who was lost afoot 
on the Sahara Desert. His motto now is "I 
surely ivoiild walk a mile for a Camel." 

Not wishing to hear anything with dryness 
connected to it, we go up a flight to the Kenny 
Kandid Korset Company. "We'll make you or 
break you" is their trade identification. We just 
miss their program starring Russell Leishman, 
Ted Bjorkman, and Tom Maloney, a blockhead, 
but not a Charley McCarthy. 

Investigating the remaining studio we discover 
Birgit Borg's cooking program in full swing. 
Her middle name must be Hathaway judging by 
the luscious samples I hear she gives out. 

Our machine revolves and we find it focused 
on the Dunbrack Propeller Company. There's 
Roland with his able assistants, Bill Kilgore, 
Jimmie Salamone, Charles Massucci, Chug Allia, 
Robert Millen, and Fred Hitchcock deep in the 
throes of work. There is a method in their mad- 
ness, however. They figured they could sell the 
city of Waltham a few propellers to go with 
the wings and tail on the old high school (now a 
field house) and send it shooting up in the air, 
thus enabling the younger athletes to have the 
privilege of enjoying their sports with a little 
more pleasure. Those supporting the idea are 
Ruth Moore, Ruth Hansen, Ruth Foley, Ruth 
Peckham, and Ruth Tidman of the "Ruthless 
Ruths" building concern. 

Now training our machine on the home or' 
Rita Mogan (the city home) where the Knit- 
wits are indulging in gossip instead of in knit- 
ting, we hear conversation between Anne Thomas, 



THE MIRROR, 19 38 



Betsey Nutting, Elsbeth Heinish, and Miriam 
Gibbs — (Still old maids). 

Anne is speaking. "I don't know how true 
this is, but I heard from Anne Kelly that the 
Noone sisters are being forced into Ethel John- 
son's Old Maids' Home." "Well," says Elsbeth, 
"they won't be lonely. Josephine Taranto, Marg. 
Thomson, Dorothy Savage, Mary Parella, and 
Elberta O'Neil are up there." "Ah! that's it." 
exclaims Miriam, "Ralph Thompson's Bachelors' 
Home is across the street. Doris Stacy, Phyllis 
Rines, Margaret Wellman, Ann Smith, and Anita 
Simeone recently attended the Junior Prom and 
May Pole ceremonies there." 

"Get them off my ear," says Shocks, "or I'll be 
worse than they are." 

Taking Shaughnessy's advice I turn my instru- 
ment to the distant town of Showhegan, Maine, 
where the World's Fair is in full swing. Our 
eyes rest first on Lynskey's Burlesque, where 
Christine Lupo is finding it hard to make a liv- 
ing as a dressmaker. We find Barbara MacAl- 
pine, now a famous Hawaiian dancer. With her 
are the Jenkins Sisters noted for their art of 
Syncopated Swing. 

Gertrude Beach, Lena Belkin, Albina Anthony, 
and Florence Atwood are in the audience: Un- 
known to the management, they are arduously 
trying to censor the show so that they may rent 
the building for the Annual Girl Scout Exhibi- 
tion, under the direction of Betty Monahan, 
National Girl Scout Leader for five successive 
terms. Her committee is comprised of Joan An- 



nunziata, Anne Banis, Marion Barry, Virginia 
VVanberg, Josephine Vanaria, and Lena Santa- 
lucito. The proceeds of the exhibition are to help 
to defray the expenses incurred in shipping a few 
of the fairer sex to Bachelors' Isle (Fox Island) 
off the coast of Norumbega. May the heavens 
bless them! (I mean the bachelors.) 

As time is growing short we focus our dynamic 
rays upon the Waltham Common where Betty 
Connelly is leading the "Anti-Shower League" in 
its quest to do away with the compulsory 
shower act now in extreme use at the new Wal- 
tham High School. Among her ardent followers 
are Dorothy Clifford, Margaret Christoffersen, 
Olga Carrissimi, Margaret Phelan, and Edith 
Porter. Coming from nowhere is Dorothy Shelin 
of the "Pro-Shower League" and her faithful col- 
leagues Flo Sheridan and Mary Tortorella repre- 
senting the American Soap Company, who are 
filing protests because of the decrease in the sale 
of soap caused by the opposition of the "Anti- 
Shower League". 

In another section of the common we see Olive 
Regan and Juanita Perrot, now owners of the 
Waltham Ice Company, fighting feverishly with 
Henry Ashley and James Murphy, Frigidaire 
Manufacturers. 

Before we turn the dial in an effort to secure 
additional illuminating views within the scope of 
our double binocular television glass, there is a 
loud crash. The hill begins to reverberate; it 
slips down, down, down, into the crevice — 
That's all! 

Arthur J. Clark, 1938. 



THE MIRROR, 1938 



Who's Who in the Class of 1938 



Boy Most Likely To Succeed 

Girl Most Likely To Succeed 

Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Giri 

Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 

Most Studious Boy 

Most Studious Girl 

Best Actor 

Best Actress 

Most Cheerful Boy 

Most Cheerful Girl 

Class Bad Man 

Best Dressed Boy 

Best Dressed Girl 

Class Baby 

Most Athletic Boy 

Most Athletic Girl 

Brightest Social Light 

Class Clown 



Edmund Harris 

Ethel Johnson 

Forrest Daniels 

Betty Stevens 
Edmund Harris 

Anne Thomas 
John Sloane 

Anne Thomas 

Winslow Bettinson 

Ethel Johnson 

Edward Recka 
Marie Carlson 

James Ferelli 
Edmund Harris 

Betty Stevens 

Leo Gallitano 

Arthur Shaughnessy 

Barbara Bent 

Betty Stevens 
Francis Roweli. 



'-' 



Class Pictures 



and 



Statistics 



ARLINE ADAMS 

Ad, Adams 
What 'cha been doing? (a) 
England (b) 
To be a success in whatever 

I do (c) 
Senior Play Cast, 3; Candy 

Girl for Dramatic Club 

Play, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2; 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2 (d) 



CARL C. ADAMS 
C. A. 

Quiet, please (a) 

Bryant and Stratton's Business 
School (b) 

To become a successful busi- 
ness man (c) 

Golf, 2; Football, 3 (d) 




RAYMOND J. ADAMS 

Ray, Ad. 
Oh sure; You said that right; 

Heck, yes; Heck, no (a) 
I intend to go a long way 

(b) 
Don't wish to commit myself 

(c) 

Track, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Dra- 
matic Club Play, 3; Class 
officer, 1 ; Nominating Com- 
mittee, 3; Senior Play, 3; 
Soph Dance Comm., 1 ; 
Mirror Business Staff, 1, 2 
(d) 

CARMEN EMELIA ALGERI 
None 

Forget it (a) 

Leland Powers School of the 
Theatre (b) 

To succeed as Radio and Tel- 
evision artist (c) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Sen- 
ior Band, 2, 3; Mirror (as- 
sistant Exchange Editor) 3; 
Senior Play, 3 (d) 



CARMELO ALLIA 

Chuck, Camel 
And how! Take it easy (a) 
California. Italy after I retire 

from business (b) 
To produce a fruit orchard 

on Felton street (c) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2; Basketball, 

1, 2 (d) 



GORDON FRANKLIN AN- 
DERSON 
Dodo, Dopey 

Hollywood, California (b) 

Art director (c) 

Track, 2; Mirror Agent, 1, 2; 
Homework, 1, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1 ; Usher at Gradua- 
tion Class of '37, 2 (d) 



JOHN LESLIE ANDERSON 

Les or Andy 
It could be (a) 
Sweden (b) 
To be a success in life (c) 




JOAN CATHERINE AN 

NUNCIATA 

Jen or Joansie 
Oh, gee (a) 
Heaven (b) 
To see the world (c) 
Bowling, 1; Honor Roll, 1; 

Commercial Club 3 (d) 




ALBINA ANTHONY 
Binky, Tonie, Beana, AI 

Oh yeah, no I mean Oh yes 
Gertie and Babbie (a) 

To Vienna to study music (b) 

To become a successful vio- 
linist (c) 

Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2; Commercial 
Club, 3; Safety Council, 3; 
Concert Master of High 
School Operetta, 3 (d) 

HENRY L. ASHLEY 

Hank 
Unheard of situation (a) 
Annapolis (b) 
To play tennis on the center 

court at Wimbledon (c) 
Football, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 

3; Tennis Team, 3 (d) 



Note: ( a ) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (J) Activities 



FLORENCE ATWOOD 

Flossie or Flo 
Hi ya, Keed (a) 
Arizona (b) 

To work in an office (c) 
Basketball, 3 ; Commercial 

Club, 3; Safety Council 3 

(d) 



JOHN ARRIGO 

Johnny 
Hi there (a) 
A course at Bentley's School 

of Accounting (b) 
C. P. A. (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2 (d) 







EDMOND AUCOIN 

Nemo 
Hi, Keety (Hi Kid) (a) 
California (b) 
To get a good start in life 

(c) 

Basebell, 2, 3; Hockey, Bas- 
ketball, Ping Pong (d) 



ANNE JANET BANIS 

Oh, really? (a) 

Mexico (b) 

To be a success at whatever 
I do (c) 

Promptress of Senior Play, 3 ; 
Dramatic Club, 1, 3 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 



MARION L. BARRY 

Good 'nuff. That's decent of 

you (a) 
Some nurses' training school 

(b) 

T® see Flo when she isn't ask- 
ing, "Got anything to eat?" 
(c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



ALAN F. BATSTONE 
Al or Batty 

So what? It's O. K. by me, 
Hi ya, Slugg (a) 

An Electrical School (b) 

To follow the sea or Electri- 
cal Engineer (c) 

Debating Club, 1 ; Senior 
Play, 3 (d) 



GERTRUDE BEACH 
Trudy, Gertie 

Honest do you mean it? Oh, 
Beana! (a) 

Paris or Hawaii (b) 

To go to Paris and study cos- 
tume design (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Safety 
Council, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
3 (d) 




ROY R. BEAUDOIN 



LENA BELKIN 

Unky, Lake 
Hello, stranger (a) 
Heaven? (Charles street near 

Moody) (b) 
To do the Little Apple (c) 



ANGELA BENENATI 

Wee One 
Isn't that sad? Isn't that cute? 

( a ) 
Europe in order to see the 

seven wonders of the world 

(b) 

A good dancer and being suc- 
cessful in whatever I at- 
tempt to do (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



PAUL BENSON 



BARBARA L. BENT 
Barb 

Aw Ga-wanl, Yes, O. K. (a) 

Chicago, Illinois (b) 

To become an excellent tele- 
phone operator (c) 

Commercial Club, 3; Oper- 
etta, 3; Basketball, "class 
team," "varsity", 1, 2, 3 ; 
Baseball, "class team," "var- 
sity", 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 
"class team", "varsity", 1, 
2,3; Archery, "class team" 
2,3; Volley Ball, "class 
team", 1, 2, 3; Field Hock- 
ey, "class team", "varsity" 
1, 2, 3 (d) 

H. WINSLOW BETTIN- 
SON 
Win 

Leland Powers School of 
Radio (b) 

To be active in radio work 
(c) 

Senior Band, 1, 2, 3; Radio 
Broadcasts, 1, 2; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, Executive Comm., 2 ; 
Dramatic Club Play, 3; 
Senior Play, 3 ; Royal Vag- 
abond, 3; Senior Nominat- 
ing Committee, 3 (d) 



PRISCILLA BIDDLE 



A. THEODORE BJORKMAN 

Ted 
Northeastern University (b) 
To be either a clergyman or 

a doctor (c) 
Tennis, 2, 3 (d) 








LORING BERGGREN 

Bery, Ben, or Swede 
Don't rush me. If I knew I'd 

tell ya (a) 
Northeastern University (b) 
To become an engineer and 

surprise some people (c) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2; Basketball, 

1, 2; Dramatic Club, 2 (d) 



DWIGHT ANDREW BERRY 

Dab 

ing of something to eat! 
Be good now. Always think- 

(a) 
In a home that is a home — 

and run on the order that 
it will have to be my own 

Ma's is run now (b) 
To be able to do a really 

good pastel portrait — that 

I am pleased with (c) 



ELEANOR BLANCHARD 

El 
You're not funny (a) 
California (b) 
To be a good stenographer 

(c) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Bowiing, 1, 
2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Vol- 
ley Ball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1, 2, 3; Archery, 1; Secre- 
tary Commercial Club, 
Room Agent, 2, 3; Nomi- 
nating Comm., 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1 (d) 

DORIS BOMENGEN 
Elmer or Dot 

Know what? (a) 

Seattle, Washington and the 

Hawaiian Islands (b) 

To become a good typist and 
filing clerk (c) 

Basketball, 1 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Baseball, 1; Hon- 
or Roll, 1 (d) 



MORRIS BORDENCA 
Dub, Mo, Morry 

Well, I dunno, Next (a) 

Boston College then Medical 
School (b) 

To be a (famous) doctor be- 
fore Ed Harris (Hi, Harris) 
(c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Dra- 
matic Club, 2; Jr. Prom. 
Comm., 2; Basketball, 1; 
Student Red Cross Council, 
3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, {4) Activities 



BIRGIT EMELIA BORG 

Burgic, Bee 
Honest? No kidding, (a) 
A visit to Sweden (b) 
To be a good nurse (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Safety- 
Council, 3 (d) 



LILLIAN MARY BORGER 
Lil 

You can't win no matter 
which way you slice it! (a) 

Big business office (b) 

World cruise on my honey- 
moon (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Nomi- 
nating Committee, 2 ; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2; Archery, 1; 
Field Hockey, 1, 2; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 




DOROTHY ANN BRADY 
Dot 

I don't know (a) 

Wilfred Academy then L. M. 
(b) 

To travel through Ireland and 
to inherit a fortune (c) 

Room Agent for Mirror, 1 ; 
Class Bowling, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity Bowling, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 3 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Archery, 2; Field 
Hockey, 1, 2 (d) 



MONA MARIE BREEN 
Sister or Breeny 

Promise me? (a) 

Nurses' Training School (b) 

To see Margaret and Ann 
when they don't want can- 
dy in Mr. Hodge's room 

(c) 

Honor Roll, 1; Operetta 3; 
Baseball, 1, 2 ; Cafeteria, 1, 
2, 3 (d) 



VNICENT L. BREEN 



DORIS M. BRENNAN 
Dot 

Hurry up, Anne! (a) 

Hawaii (b) 

To be successful in the busi- 
ness world. To travel (c) 

Commercial Club 3 (d) 



ERNA ARLENE BRENNAN 

Really? (a) 

Miami, Florida and Bermuda 

(b) 

To make people happy (c) 
Commercial Club, 2, 3 (d) 



•■■■■ 

-1 




NORMAN F. BURDETT 
Norm, Burdettii, Benny 

D'yar love me ? Who's a 
creep? Ah! she's cute (a) 

U. S. Coast Guard Academy 

(b) 
She knows or to become a 

commissioned officer in the 

Coast Guard (c) 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Library Club, 

1, 2 (d) 



RUTH M. BURNHAM • 
Ruthie, Rusty 

But definitely — Yes, Mr. 
Ward! (a) 

Ipswich, Massachusetts (b) 

To be a success (c) 

Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; Execu- 
tive Board of Dram. Club, 
3; Chmn. of Dram. Club 
Play, 3 ; Royal Vagabond, 
3; Asst. Chmn. Senior Play, 
3 (d) 

JOHN BUTLER 

Hoppy 
Hey! Shrimp (a) 
Clarkson Engineering School 

(b) 
To become a good cow 

puncher (c) 
Baseball, 2; Hockey, 2, 3; 

Golf, 2; Football, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



THELMA BURNS 
Touti or Burnsey 

It's all right if you can get 
away with it (a) 

I hope to enter a Nurses' 
Training School (b) 

I should like to be a govern- 
ment Red Cross Nurse (c) 

Basketball, 1; Bowling, 1; 
Archery, 1 (d) 

ANNE PHYLLIS CANNIS- 
TRARO 
Annie 

That will be the day (a) 

School of Practical Arts (b) 

Art teacher (c) 

Hockey (class team) 1, 2, 3; 
Volley Ball (class team), 1, 
2, 3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball (class team), 1, 2, 
3; Archery (class team), 1, 
2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Ten- 
nis, 1, 2 (d) 

JOSEPH A. CARDILLO 
Loopy 

Get on the ball — Tough 
little time (a) 

The zodiac (b) 

To be an impresario (c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Chmn. 
Jr. Prom, 2; Commercial 
Club, 2; Pres. Commercial 
Club, 3; Sr. Football Man- 
ager, 3; Sr. Dance Comm. 
3; Literary Staff of "Mir- 
ror", 3; Football Usher, 1, 
2 ; Intra-Mural Basketball, 

1, 2, 3 (d) 

MARIE CARLSON 
Carlie, Swede 

Oh, sugar. Oh dear, dear what 
can the matter be? (a) 

To be a success in whatever 
I plan to do (c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Nomi- 
nating Comm., 1, 2; Junior 
Prom Comm., 2 ; Class Of- 
ficer (sec-treas.), 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3; Writer of 
Who's Who, 3; Picture 
Comm., 3; Hockey, Class 
and Varsity, 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball, class and varsity, 1, 

2, 3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Vol- 
ley Ball, class, 1, 2, 3; 
Archery, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 
1, 2, 3 (d) 

JAMES CARNEY 
Jimmie 

Hi, Face (a) 

Navy Air Corps, California 
(b) 

To have Lou Eimer pitch 
against me in the big 
leagues (c) 

Baseball, 1, 2; Football, 1; 
Hockey, 3 ; Golf, 1 ; Swim- 
ming, etc., Commercial 
Club, 3 (d) 






A\ %^j^A 




Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambit 



ion, 



SIDNEY S. CANTER 
Shim, Kelly 

You should live so monkeys 
should only come out of 
your ears (a) 

B. U. nights (b) 

To join the Army Air Corps 
(c) 

Football, 1 ; Intra-Mural Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



BENNY CAPPADONA 
Benny the Boom Boom 

That's right (a) 

Hopolong's Dude Ranch in 
Montana (b) 

To be a State Policeman (c) 

Hockey, 2; Baseball, 1; Foot- 
ball, 3 (d) 



HELEN CARTER 
Pyu 

Hi ya, honeychild (a; 

New York and Paris (b) 

To become a successful cos- 
tume designer (c) 

North Junior Alumni Dance 
Committee, 1 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Carol Sing- 
ing, 3; Safety Council, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1 ; "Royal 
Vagabond" (operetta) 3 
(d) 

FLORENCE M. CASTEL- 
LANO 
Flo, Fo 

I don't get it. Hurry up will 
ya? (a) 

Gironde, France (b) 

To be a good sportswoman. 
To be successful in what- 
ever I do (c) 

Field Hockey, (class team and 
varsity), 2, 3; Basketball, 
(class team and varsity), 1, 
2, 3; capt; Archery, (class 
team), 2; Volley Ball, 
(class team), 1, 2, 3; Base- 
ball, (class team), 1, 2; 
Bowling, (class team and 
varsity), l, 2, 3; Royal 
Vagabond, 3 ; Christmas 
Carols, 3 (d) 

MARGARET CASTNER 
Peggy or Argie 

You would', (a) 

Private Secretarial position 
(b) 

To build a bungalow (c) 

Volley Ball, 1, 2; Baseball, 
1; Commercial, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3; Literary Staff 
of Mirror, 1, 2, 3; Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2; Archery, 1 (d) 

(d) Activities 



1 



MELVIN CHAPIN 

Mel 
May I? (a) 

Stockbridge Academy (b) 
Stay sober (c) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



flR? 



ALICE A. CHRISTIE 
Chris, Christie, Al, 
Grum-py 
So what ? ( a ) 

Wherever he takes me. Or 
the end of the world and 
back again (b) 

To be successful in business 
and then a good house-wife 
for that certain some one 
(c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Bowl- 
ing, 1; Baseball, 1 (d) 



FRANK CLARK 

Clarky 
Well, I made it, didn't I? 

(a) 

Bentley's School of Account- 
ing, Boston (b) 

To be a C. P. A. some day 

Soph. Hockey, 1; Tennis, 2, 
3 ; Executive Comm. Dram. 
Club, 3; Dramatic Club, 2, 
3 ; Sr. Play Comm., 3 ; Ra- 
dio Broadcasts, 1 (d) 

PRISCILLA CLARK 
Sis, Clarkie 

Same here (a) 

College (after W. H. S.) but 
then — ? (b) 

To travel (c) 

Commercial Club, 3; Field 
Hockey, varsity, 2, 3 ; Class 
team Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Class team Basketball, 1 ; 
Class team Volley Ball, 1, 
2 ; Class team Baseball, 2 ; 
Girls' Sport Editor, "Mir- 
ror, 3 (d) 

WARREN F. CLARK 

Sarah 
Hurry up, Bill (a) 
Somewhere (b) 
To be a success and to see 

America (c) 
Honor Roll, 2 ; Commercial 

Club, 3 (d) 









MARGARET CHRISTOF- 
FERSON 
Tillie 

Nothing. For goodness sake 

(a) 
World's Fair of 1939 (b) 
To be a success (c) 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Commercial 

Club, 3 (d) 



ARTHUR J. CLARK 
Artie, Art, Dazzler 

Yes, suh. Home cooking (a) 

Tsimanandrafozana, Madagas- 
car (b) 

Law in all forms; a success- 
ful lawyer (c) 

Nominating Comm., 1, 2; 
Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; As- 
sistant Adv. Mgr. of "Mir- 
ror", 1, 2; Baseball Ass't. 
Mgr., 1; Jr. Prom, Comm., 
2; Football, 2; Pies. Lit'y. 
Club, 2; Mr. Mitchell's 
Mock Trial, 2 ; Sr. Class 
Prophet, 3; Sr. Class Aud- 
itor, 3; Adv. Mgr. of "Mir- 
ror", 3; Golf Mgr., 3; So- 
cial Service Chmn., 3 ; Sr. 
Play Comm., 3; Safety 
Council, 3 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3 (d) 

DOROTHY MARGARET 
CLIFFORD 
Dot 

Go 'way (a) 

New York's World Fair and 
Bermuda ( b ) 

To open a "Beauty Shop" (c) 

Dancing, Swimming, Ice Skat- 
ing, Commercial Club, 3 ; 
Bowling (d) 

HARRIET MIA COLE 
Mia 

No kidding (a) 

Cairo (b) 

To be a successful surgical 
nurse (c) 

V. P. S. J. H. Alumni, 3; 
Royal Vagabond, 3 ; Basket- 
ball, 2 ; Bowling, 2 ; Senior 
Dance Comm., 3 ; Sr. Nom- 
inating Comm., 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 



OLIVE COLLINS 
Ollie 

Forget it — Don't let il 

bother you (a) 
To see the U. S. Then the 

South Sea Islands (b) 
To own a Beauty Parlor (c) 
Bowling, 1; Field Hockey, i, 

2 (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



MAUDE ELIZABETH CON- 
NELLY 
Betty 

Oh, he's all right — physi- 
cally (a) 

Cambridge School of Liberal 
Arts (b) 

To emulate Dorothy Thomp- 
son (c) 
Mirror", 1, 2, 3; Varsity 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Field 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2; Dramatic Club, 
2 ; Basketball, 1 ; Bowling, 
1 (d) 

JOHN CORCORAN 
Stretch 

What do you think? (a) 

Anyplace I will be a success 
(b) 

To learn how to play a clar- 
inet (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3 (d) 

PEARL CREVOSHAY 
Crevie, Poilie 

I think you've got something 
there (a) 

Where all good people go 
(b) 

To get all the money back 
that I lent (a) 

Soph. Nominating Comm., 1 ; 
Field Hockey Mgr., 1, 2, 
3; Basketball Mgr., 1, 2, 
3; Volley Ball, 1, 3; Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 
3 ; Honor Roll, 1 ; Archery, 
1, 3; Safety Council, 3 
(d) 

ALDEA CUNNIFFE 
Al, Dea 

Go away, I wonder? If first 
you don't pass history, try, 
try again (a) 

A cruise to the South Sea 
Islands with Dixie (b) 

Attend Forsythe Dental 
School, or manager of 

Woolworth's (c) 

Honor P.oll, 1 ; Nominating 
Comm., 1 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Basketball, 1, 2 
Baseball, 1 ; Bowling, 1 
Volley Ball, 1; Archery, 1 
Tennis, 1 ; Field Hockey, 
1 (d) 







GERTRUDE COTTON 

Gert, Gertie 
You can tell. Is that so? (a) 
Just to get away from Wal- 

tham and pay a visit to 

Ireland, (b) 
Dressmaker, Own a car (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2;; Baseball, 1; 

Bowling, 1, 2(d) 



MARGERY COX 
Marg, Margie 

Why, oh! (a) 

The Alps in Switzerland (b) 

To become a good secretary 
(c) 

Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; Hon- 
or Roll, 1 ; Royal Vaga- 
bond, 3 ; Commercial Club, 
3 (d) 



GEORGE PETE DADDONA 

Rube 
Got a nickel for a cup of 

coffee (a) 
Alcatraz (b) 

To own the Boston Bees (c) 
Football, 1, 2, S; Baseball, 1 

(d) 



JOHN DAHI.IN 

Johnnie 
A wise guy (a) 
Northeastern (b) 
To fly (c) 



ill 



ROYAL CURRAN 
Roy 

Quiet, Kelly! (a) 

U. S. Naval Academy, An- 
napolis, Md. (b) 

To be a naval officer (c) 

Dance Comm., 1; Band, 1, 2, 
3; Football, 1; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3 (d) 

Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 




EDWARD J. DALEY 

Spike 
I owe ya Larry (a) 
Madison Square Garden Ring 

(b) 
See Skip get a case of wheat- 

ies (c) 
Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 3 

(d) 



" 



FORREST ALLEN DAN- 
IELS, JR. 
Hacker, Pro 
Hucker Keed! (a) 

Duke University (b) 

To win Warrendale Open 
Demis P. G. A. and be as- 
sislant to Mr. Sheehy (c) 

Golf Team, 1, 2, capt., 3; Sr. 
Dance Comm., Soph. Dance 
Comm., Sr. Play, Vice Pres. 
Soph. Class, Staff Photog- 
rapher for "Mirror" (d) 

CAROLYN MAE DAVIS 

Cal, Feanut, Nellie 
Yes, yes, it could be! Still 

love me, Honey? Wanna 

sLart a jam? (a) 
Perry's Kindergarten School 

or Faulkner Hospital (b) 
Stewardess on American Air 

Line (c) 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Hockey, 

1, 2; Bowling, 1, 2; Base- 
ball, 1 ; Christmas Carols, 

2, 3; Senior Play,. 3; Royal 
Vagabond, 3 (d) 

ROBERT DERBYSHIRE 
Derby, Bob, Derb 

What's up? (a) 

Chance may find it, who 
knows ? ( b ) 

To hit the jack-pot in some 
racket (c) 



MADELINE DICKS 

Dixie, Mai, Youngster 

That's true, go away (a) 

To go to the South Sea Is^ 
• lands with Al (b) 

To be a successful secretary 
or to be a dancing teacher 
(c) 

Honor Roll, 1 ; Jr. Prom 
Comm., 2 ; Commercial 
Club, 3 ; Candy Girl for 
Sr. Play, 3 ; Royal Vaga- 
bond, 3 (d) 

ALBERT DIGREGORY 
Al 

How's your heart? (a) 

France or Canada (b) 

To be my own boss in busi- 
ness and in Private Life 
(c) 

Football, 1 ; Commercial Club, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (d) 





ESTELLE DEACON 

S, Stell 

Fine thing (a) 

California (b) 

To be successful (c) 

Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; Hon- 
or Roll, 1 ; Dramatic Club, 
2; Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



ESTHER LINDA DEMEO 

Really (a) 

Washington and California 
(b) 

To be a success in whatever 
I do (c) 

Dramatic Club, 3 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 2 ; Secretary of 
Reading Club, 1 ; Member 
Dramatic Club Cast, 3; 
Member of the Senior Play 
Cast, 3 (d) 



WILLIAM DION 

Warehouse 
I'll mow you down (a) 
Hoppy Butler's Ranch in 

Texas (b) 
To become part owner of 

Hoppy's Ranch (c) 
Class Basketball, 2; Golf, 2; 

Football, 2 (d) 



EDNA LOUISE DOLBER 
Ed 

I'll bite (a) 

Fitchburg State Teachers' 

College (b) 
To be a French teacher (c) 
Honor Roll, 3; Tennis, 2 (d) 



JOHN N. DONAHUE 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, {d) Activities 



AUSTIN L. DOUGHERTY 
Oss 

'Could be (a) 

Northeastern University Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts (b) 
To travel the world (c) 
Orchestra, 2 (d) 



R. RICHARD DOW 
Dick, Baldy, Maestro 

What's the story? (a) 

Hawaiian Islands under the 
palm trees drinking cocoa- 
nut milk (b) 

To be a band leader, to 
cruise the South Seas, and 
to make up my mind (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3 ; Soph. Nom- 
inating Comm., 1 ; Room 
Agent for "Mirror", 2; 
Hockey Mgr., 2, 3; Cast 
"The Royal Vagabond, 3; 
Christmas Carols, 3 (d) 

VIRGINIA EATON 

Jinny, Jigga 
I don't remember, honest? 

(a) 

New Brunswick (b) 

Raise thoroughbred horses & 
to be a more accomplished 
horsewoman (c) 

Jr. Prom Comm., 2 ; Sr. Nom- 
inating Comm., 3 ; Dramat- 
ic Club, 1, 2; Sr. Dance 
Comm., 3 (d) 

WALTER S. EBERHARD 

Sid, Walt, Wally 
Quiet, Kelly! (a) 
Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology (b) 
To graduate from there (c) 
Senior Band, 1, 2, 3; Chorus 

"Royal Vagabond", 3; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



LOUIS EIMER 
Lou, Sonny 

Hey-boy, Hucka (a) 

Alaska and the Isle ofMicic- 
ha Marcoco (b) 

To play ball for the Boston 
Red Sox (c) 

Hockey, 1 ; Baseball, 2 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 





ROLAND L. DUNBRACK 

Roily 
Foo. Who done it? (a) 
Went worth (b) 
To find a sinecure (c) 

KATHERINE WEBSTER 
EATON 
Kathleen, Babe, Kay 

You're pretty too! (a) 

Wheaton College (b) 

Dean of women (c) 

"Mirror, 1, 2; Chmn. Liter- 
ary Comm., 3; Honor Roll, 

1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 
2; Candy Girl Chairman 
Dram. Club, 3 ; Chmn. 
Executive Comm. Dram. 
Club, 3 (d) 

GEORGE H. ELLIS 

Sunshine 

Get off the dime (a) 

A course in law at Boston 
University, and a future 
Boston & Maine Railroad 
employee (b) 

To be a successful business 
man in no matter what line 
of business I enter (c) 

Soph. Dance Comm., 1 ; Jr. 
Prom Comm., 2 ; Sr. Dance 
Comm., 3; Football, 1, 3; 
Basketball, 2, 3; Golf, 3; 
Tennis, 2, 3; Chmn. Nom- 
inating Comm, 3; Commer- 
cial Club, 3; Honor Roll, 
3; Musical Operetta "The 
Royal Vagabond", 3 (d) 

LEONARD ERICKSON 
Swede, Garters, Len 

Yeah. Got the key? (a) 

Minnesota first, then to Swe- 
den (b) 

To travel and to be a success 
(c) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 
3; Track, 3; Junior Prom 
Comm., 2 ; Senior Dance 
Comm., 3; Chmn. Picture 
Comm., 3 ; Student Rep. on 
Athletic Comm., 3; Vice- 
Pres., of Class, 3; Usher 
Class Day and Graduation 
of Class of 1937, 2 (d) 

ARLENE FAWSON 

Pretty good! Pretty good! (a) 

Go on Hostel Tour through 

Europe (b) 
To be a social secretary (c) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 

2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Volley Ball, 1, 2, 3; Ar- 
chery, 1, 2; Tennis, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 1, 2; Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3; Commercial Club. 
3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



BARBARA FELT 
Barb, Babs 

What's the matter? I don't 
see why not (a) 

Where it's heavenly or Fair- 
view Park (b) 

To be a good interior deco- 
rator (c) 

Orchestra, 1, 2; Art Club, 2 
(d) 



JAMES FERRELLI, JR 

Pappy, Gunniffe 
Got anything to eat? Got a 

date, Hack? (a) 
Massachusetts College of 

Pharmacy (b) 
To own the Harvard. To 

blow up Piety Corner. To 

move Prospect Hill to the 

Corner (c) 
Football, 3; Track, 3 (d) 




JAMfca FERRO 

Long Jim 
Get out of my life! (a) 
To live on Hoppie Butler's 

Ranch in Texas (b) 
To win the Sweepstakes (c) 
Football, 1, 3 (d) 



BARBARA JEAN FILSON 

Phil 
Listen now — (a) 
Nurse — Faulkner Hospital 

(b) 
To see Niagara Falls (c) 



BERNARD C. FINE 

Bernie, Mike, Proli, Joe 
Go back to the Old Country 

(a) 
Ohio State U. or Chicago U. 

(b) 
Lawyer or millionaire (c) 
Band, 1, 2 (d) 



DONALD E. FLOYD 

Don 
No kiddin' (a) 
Bentley School of Accounting 

(b) 
To be a successful business 

man (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



OLIVE B. FOLEY 
Oly 

What's next for the day? 

Hey, Barb (a) 
California and Western States 

(b) 
To get a good job (c) 
Field Hockey, 1 ; Archery,, 1 ; 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 




RICHARD J. FORD 
Dick 

What's the matter? (a) 

Northeastern (b) 

To be a successful engineer 
or have a woodworking 
concern (c) 

Senior Band, 1, 2, 3; Orches- 
tra, 3 ; Bugler for Christ- 
mas Carols, 3 (d) 



AMY ELIZABETH FRANKS 

Nicky 
Definitely (a) 
Deaconess Hospital (b) 
To have Win back in Boston 

(c) 



LEO GALLITANO 

Kid 
Hucka keed (a) 
Italy (b) 

To become a chemist (c) 
Basketball Manager, 3 (<J) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



HENRY W. GARDNER 
Hank 

What's up? (a) 

Southern Waltham (b) 

To be a success (c) 

Basketball, 3; Student Coun- 
cil, 3 (d) 



DOROTHEA ELIZABETH 
GAY 

Dodo 

New England Conservatory 
of Music (b) 

To be able to play the piano 
well. To play accompani- 
ments for vocalists (c) 

Archery, 1 (d) 




MARY LOUISE GIAMO 
Mae 

Let's go in here! (a) 

Three guesses ! (b) 

Graduate from Wilfred's 
Academy (c) 

Baseball, 1 ; Room Agent, 
"Mirror", P.ed Cross, 1 ; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 



EMILY GIBBS 

Tiny 

For crying in a bucket (a) 

Boston University (b) 

To have a girls' band that 
can beat W. H. S. band (c) 

Cafeteria, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2, 
3; Band, 2, 3; Field Hock- 
ey and Baseball, 1 ; Christ- 
mas Carol Singing, 3; Ra- 
dio Broadcasts, 2 (d) 



MIRIAM GIBBS 
Mini 

Not really! (a) 

Wheaton College if I ever 
get there (b) 

To be a success (c) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Liter- 
ary Staff, 1, 2, 3; Senior 
Dance Comm. (d) 



JOAN GILBERT 

Tillie 

Joanie or Jay 
Hurry up ! ! ! ! (a) 
Cushing Academy (b) 
Go to Hawaii (c) 
Jr. Prom Comm., 2; Candy 

Girl Sr. Play, 3; Dramatic 

Club, 1, 2 (d) 



MATILDA GINSBERG 

Why? (a) 
New York (b) 
Be successful in whatever I 
do (c) 




BARBARA A. GLASS 
Barbs or Glassie 

Hi, Liz! Where do we go 
now? (a) 

Duxbury (b) 

To get a good office position 
(c) 

Field Hockey, 1 ; Radio 
Broadcasts, 1; "Mirror" 
Staff, 1, 2; Dramatic Club, 
1; Honor Roll, 3; Sr. Play 
Comm., 3 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Safety Council, 3 
(d) 

THEODORE GOGUEN 
Ted or Duck 

Hi, Keed ! What ya got to 
eat? (a) 

To visit a different place 
every week end (b) 

To find a good job and event- 
ually become a C. P. A. 
(c) 

Nominating Comm., 2; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 

MARJORIE L. GOODRICFI 

Margie 
Massachusetts School of Art 

(b) 
To be a Commercial Artist 

(c) 
Honor Roll, 2, 3 ; Room 

Agent, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (r) Ambition, (el) Aclintics 



ELAINE BETTY GORDON 

Betsy 
No joke (a) 
College (b) 
To teach the deaf children 

(c) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Nominat- 
ing Comm., 2 ; Baseball, 1 ; 
Bowling, 1, 2 (d) 



ANITA GRENIER 

Frenchie 
How'd ya like it? (a) 
Hawaii (b) 
To be a good stenographer 

(c) 
Bowling, 1, 2; Baseball, 1; 
Archery, 1 ; Volley Ball, 1 ; 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 






JOSEPH JOHN GULLOTTI 

Joe or Prof 
How're they goin' ? Nice tie 

you have there! (a) 
World's Fair, 1939 New 

York (b) 
To start an athletic club (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Safety 

Council, 3 (d) 



CHARLOTTE HADLEY 

Sugar 
Oh, heck! Gee' (a) 
To Hawaii (b) 
To be a success in what I 

attempt to do and make a 

good wife (c) 



RICHARD P. HANDRA- 

HAN 

Dick or Jake 
Okay, you can go back to 

sleep now. Can't make me 

mad (a) 
21 Washburn Ave. (b) 
To travel around the world a 

few times (c) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Operetta, 3; 

Christmas Carols, 3 (d) 



LUCILLE M. HANNA 
Peter or Tuppy 

Dash it! (a) 

Boston University, College of 
Liberal Arts (b) 

Teaching Latin, in W. H. S. 
preferably (c) 

"Mirror" Staff, 1, 2, 3; Hon- 
or Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



RUTH HANSEN 
Ruthie or Boots 
Oh, really! (a) 
Mount Vernon (b) 
Study music (c) 
Honor Roll, 2; Dramatic 



Club, 
(d) 



Operetta cast, 3 




RUTH HELEN HANSEL- 
PACKER 
Ruthie or Hansie 

Honestly (a) 

Florida (b) 

To be successful in whatever 
I attempt to do (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Junior 
Prom Comm., 2; Honor 
Roll, 2 ; Commercial Club, 
3 (d) 



DOROTHY HAPENNY 
Dot 

What's the matter? (a) 

Burdett College (b) 

To be better than a good 
stenographer (c) 

Bowling, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; Bas- 
ketball, 1 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Volley Ball, 1 
(d) 



CARL I. HARON 

Boris 
Oh Foo (a) 

Northeastern University (b) 
Rocket to the heights in sci- 
ence (c) 
Operetta, 3 ; Literary Staff of 
"Mirror", 2, 3; Radio Club, 
1; Honor Roll, 1; Home- 
work, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



CLIFFORD F. 

HARRINGTON Jr. 



EDMUND JOHN HARRIS 

Ed 

Jingoes (a) 
Harvard College (b) 
Doctor or Business Executive 

Class Pres., 2, 3; Honor Roll, 

1, 2, 3; Chmn. Social, 1; 
Ass't. Bus. Mgr. of "Mir- 
ror", 1; Publicity Mgr. of 
"Mirror", 2; Sports Editor 
of "Mirror", 3; Hockey, 1, 

2, 3; Golf, 2, 3; Tennis, 
2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1; Sr. Band, 1, 2, 3; 
Head Usher Class Day and 
Graduation, 2; Law Club, 
2 (d) 

ROBERT HIGGINS 
Bob 

Jingoes (a) 

Undecided (b) 

Mr. Crawford's private physi- 
cian and surgeon (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 
2, 3; Track, 2, 3; Capt. 
Track, 3; Operetta "The 
Royal Vagabond", 3; Soph. 
Dance Comm., 1 ; Safety 
Council, 3 (d) 

CHESTER FRANKLIN 
HILL, JR. 
Chet 

Take a letter — take two — take 

the whole alphabet, I'm no 

piker! ! (a) 
Maine for two weeks, then 

to work (I hope) (b) 
To even up and top the score 

with Miss Perkins (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (d) 

ELROY HILL 
Roy or Red 
Get smart. Get spooky (a) 
To see a little of this world 

(b) 

Something better than the 
next one (c) 





ELSBETH HEINISH 

Elsie 
Lissen, there's a limit to 

everything! (a) 
College (b) 
To land somewhere on top 

(c) 
Literary Staff on "Mirror , 1, 
2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Ten- 
nis, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; 
Radio Broadcast, 1 ; Red 
Cross, 2 (d) 

EDITH HELGESON 
Bunny 

Why? (a) 

An ideal office (b) 

To fly around the world in 
an airplane with (?) (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Bowl- 
ing, 2 ; Field Hockey, 1 
(d) 



WILLIAM R. HILL 

Deacon 
Muggsee, I love yah (a) 
Maple St., Watertown (b) 
To get into and through 

Northeastern (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 (d) 



RICHARD HINCHEY 

Dick 
Full speed ahead (a) 
Northeastern University (b) 
To be an electrical engineer 
and commercial radio opera- 
tor (c) 
Radio Club, 1 ; Literary Com- 
mittee of the "Mirror", 2, 
3 (d) 

EDWARD C. HITCHCOCK 

Ed or Hitch 

CKiiet, please. That's the 
idea ! ( a ) 

Boston University (banking) 
(b) 

To be a very successful bank- 
er and financier, and to 
keep up with music as a 
pastime (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 
2, 3; "Mirror" Staff, 2, 3; 
Room Agent of "Mirror", 
1, 2, 3; Homework, 1, 2, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



FRED H. HITCHCOCK 

Freddy 
I don't know what you're 

talking about, but I agree 

with you (a) 
I've a rendezvous with destiny 

(b) 
To be Vice-President (c) 



FRANCES HODGE 

Fran, Frannie, or Hodgie 

Hi ya? Love to B (a) 

Scituate (b) 

To raise dogs (c) 

North Junior Alumni Dance 
Comm., 1, 2, 3; Room 
Agent, 1, 2, 3; Jr. Prom 
Comm., 2; Sr. Play Comm., 
3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2; 
Operetta, 3 (d) 



JEAN JENKINS 

Little 
Oh, really? (a) 
A trip to the West (b) 
To obtain a good position 

(c) 

Bowling, 1, 3; Volley Ball, 
2; Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



MARGARET JENKINS 
Peggy or Miggy 

Oh well, what's the differ- 
ence? (a) 

Norchfield Seminary (3 years 
from now) (b) 

To find my place in the 
world where I can be of 
service to others (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



HAROLD C. JENSEN 
So? So what? (a) 
Northeastern University (b) 
Get a radio amateur license 

(c) 
Art Club, 1; Radio Club, 
1 (d) 




ROBERT ELVIN HOFFSES 
Hoff, Bob, Rob't E. Hof- 
fses, Jr., Esq. 

So, what do you think? How's 
Fran, Doc? Honey, I loves 
ya (a) 

Mass. Nautical School and 
any good tramp steamer 
after that (b) 

To be a sea captain — be mar- 
ried and settled down by 
the age of 40 (c) 

Safety Council Rep., 3; Sr. 
Play Comm., 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1 ; S. J. H. Alumni 
Dance Comm., 2; Dramatic 
Club Play Comm., 3; Band, 
1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1 (d) 

MARJORIE BERYL JACOB 

Marge 
Fiddlesticks (a) 
Go out West and own a 

ranch (b) 
Private secretary (c) 
Basketball, 1; Hockey, 2; 

Archery, 2; Hockey, 3; 

Tennis, 3; Baseball, 1; (d) 

ETHEL J. JOHNSON 

Give me a bite (a) 

Boston University (b) 

Doubtful (c) 

Vice-Pres. of Dramatic Club, 
3 ; Chmn. of Sr. Play, 3 ; 
Sr. Dance Comm., 3; "Mir- 
ror" Staff, 1, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club Play, 3 (d) 



DON H. JOHNSTON 

Don 
Hay (a) 

Northeastern University (b) 
Engineer (c) 
Radio Club, 1 (d) 



IRENE KALLOW 

Tootsie 
Oh, gosh (a) 
I wish I knew (b) 
To travel around the world 

(c) 
Commercial Club, 2, 3; Arch- 
ery, 1; Volley Ball, 1 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



EVA ELSA KATON 

Kay 
Do you love me a little or a 

lot, darlink? (a) 
As far away from Waltham 

as possible (b) 
Burdelt College. To see all 

the United States (c) 



JOHN G. KATSOGIANIS 

Jack of M. Jacques 
I'll think it over (a) 
Northeastern University (b) 
To be a success in life (c) 
Soph. Nominating Comm., 1 ; 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 




AUDREY J. KEITH 

Red 
Cute Kid! (a) 
Wilfred's Academy (b) 
Have a chicken farm (c) 



CYNTHIA KELLOGG 
Cynny 

I dunno (a) 

Practical Art School (b) 

To go anywhere and to get 
there fast (c) 

Dramatic Club, 1 ; Volley 
Ball, 1; Art Staff of "Mir- 
ror", 1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 
Sr. Play Comm. (d) 



ANN KELLY 
Kelly 

Anything good to eat today ? 
(a) 

Who can tell? (b) 

Teacher ( c ) 

Hockey, 1 ; Bowling, 1 ; Arch- 
ery, 1; Operetta, 3 (d) 



DOROTHY KELLY 

Dot 
Really? No! (a) 
Lasell Junior College (b) 
To be successful (c) 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Archery, 1 ; 

Bowling, 1; Baseball, 1 (d) 



RALPH L. KELLY, JR 
Kel 

Foo, you dope, Curran. I'll 

bite (a) 
Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology (b) 
To be a chemical engineer 

(c) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Chem. 

Lab. Assistant, 2, 3 (d) 




ABRAHAM KENNEN 

Rabbi or O'Leary 
What's the rush? (a) 
To live on "Hoppy" Butler's 

ranch in Texas (b) 
To see the world (c) 
Basketball, 1 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, 



KATH LI-EN KERN 
Kay or Sis 

Really and I don't know (a) 

Framingham Teachers' Col- 
lege maybe (b) 

To visit California and go 
to Europe (c) 

Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1, 2; 
Archery, 1 ; Operetta, 3 
(d) 



NATALIE LOUISE KEYES 

Nat or Kelly 

Oh isn't he fresh? (a) 

Bridge-water Teachers' Col- 
lege (b) 

To be a successful teacher 
(c) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball Class Team, 3; Bowl- 
ing, 1, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Archery, 1, 3; Volley 
Ball Class Team, 3; Dra- 
matic Club, 3 (d) 

(d) Activities 



WILLIAM B. KILGORE 

Bill, Slugs, or Killy 
What fools these mortals be 

(a) 

Boston University (b) 

Chem. Lab. Assistant, 2 ; Sr. 

Play Stage Committee (d) 



FRANCIS KNEELAND 

Fran 
Hey, babe! (a) 
California (b) 
To be a success in business 

and sports (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 

3 ; Commercial Club, 3 ; 

Golf, 3 (d) 



ROBERT LEBLANC 

Chubby 
Grow up, Kelly! (a) 
Northeastern (?) (b) 
Become an engineer (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



ROBERT A. LEBLANC 
Sleepy Bob 

Ya can tell (a) 

Yellowstone National Park 
(b) 

A good paying job in the 
soft-collared way (c) 

Class Basketball, 1, 2; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 



LOUISE LECAIN 
Aren't we having fun? (a) 
Lake Placid, New York (b) 
To see the Olympics of 1940 
(both winter and summer). 
To get one up on Mr. 
Ward (c) 
Dramatic Club, 2 ; Basketball, 
1 ; Archery, 2 ; Field Hock- 
ey, 1 ; Tennis, 1 ; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2 (d) 




JOSEPH KYTE 

Manhattan College (b) 
Be a success (c) 
Football, 2, 3; Basketball, 
3 (d) 



2, 



CLIFTON COLBY LARSON 

Cliff 
For crying out loud (a) 
G. C.'s College of Haid 

Knocks (b) 
To get there in a hurry (c) 
Basketball, (capt), 2, 3; Sr. 

Dance Chmn., 3 (d) 



HARRIET D. LINDER 
Harry, Barry, or Happy 

You know it! (a) 

Colby Junior College (b) 

To be a success (c) 

Sr. Dance Comm., 3 ; North 
Jr. Alumni Dance Comm., 
1, 2, 3; "Mirror" Room 
Agent, 3; Candy Girl at 
Operetta, 3 (d) 



ANTHONY JOSEPH 

LAPEY 

Tone 
Don't ask me and I'll tell 

you (a) 
Washington, D. C. (b) 
C. P. A. (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



CHRISTINE LUPO 

Chris or Gov 
The nerve of some mothers' 

children (a) 
Who knows? (b) 
To get a job (c) 
Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; 

Baseball, 1 ; Commercial 

Club, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



ALICE LYNSKEY 
Al 

Who told you? (a) 

Regis (b) 

To see the world (c) 

Commercial Club, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1; Baseball, 1 (d) 



ROBERT ARNESON LYON 

Bob 
Gotcha Latin? (a) 
New Hampshire University 

( b ) 

I dunno; Caesar was ambi- 
tious and look what it got 
him (c) 

Dramatic Club, 3; Library 
Club, 1, 2; Sr. Play Comm., 
3; Dramatic Club Play 
Comm., 3; Honor Roll, 1 
(d) 



LESTER MACARTHUR 



ELEANOR L. MACDON- 

ALD 

El or Mac 
Be good now! (a) 
Wilfred Academy (b) 
To ride around in a "green" 

car (c) 
Field Hockey, 1, 2 ; Bowling, 

1, 2 (d) 



MARION MACPHEE 

Mickey 
Isn't it wonderful? (a) 
Business College (b) 
To travel (c) 
Commercial Club, 2; Field 

Hockey, 1; Baseball, 1; 

Honor Roll, 2, 3 (d) 





BARBARA MACALPINE 

Barb 
I luv yah! HTo, Darlin' (a) 
Anywhere with "F" (b) 
To be a private accountant 

in "F.'s" bank (c) 
Picture Comm., 3; Commer- 
cial Club, 3; Basketball, 1 
(d) 



BURTON GARFIELD 
MACARTHUR 

Burt, Mac, or Burtie 

What seems to be the defu- 
galty — What's the story? 
(a) 

Boston University or Mass 
State (b) 

To become a physical edu- 
cator (c) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 
2, 3 ; Nominating Comm., 
2; "Mirror" Staff, 1 (d) 



JOSEPH MADDEN 

Joe 
Hm'm'm said with the lips 

tightly closed (a) 
To live in California (b) 
To be a successful "doctor" 

and also a "band leader" 

who has got rhythm and 

new ideas (c) 



THOMAS FRANCIS 

MALONEY 

Tommy, Mai, Abbey, Ru- 
fus 

(d) 
Hey, kid. Quiet, please. Who 

do you look like? (a) 
New York City, N. Y. (b) 
To be elected President of U. 

S. (c) 
Nominating Committee, 1, 2 



ANNIE MARAGLIANO 
Annuzina 

Really, no kidding (a) 

To visit Europe some day 
(b) 

To become a great criminal 
lawyer (c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Christ- 
mas Carols, 3; 1 Act Dra- 
matic Club Play, 3; Dra- 
matic Club, 3 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 ; Operetta, 3 ; 
Drawing Club, 1 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



MARION MARGOLIS 

Magolie 

I'm hungry. Oh stop (a) 

Heaven, to go to the World's 
Fair (b) 

To be successful in the busi- 
ness world (c) 

Commercial, 3 (d) 



WANDA MARLINSKA 

'Ya think so? (a) 

? only knows (b) 

To see the World's Fair '39- 

'40 (c) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 (d) 




CHARLES J. MASUCCI 
Charlie or Joe 

Tough huh! Get off my ear. 
Get a word in (a) 

Annapolis Naval Academy. A 
good job or to cruise (b) 

To be a leader of a hot, 
swingy orchestra, or to be- 
come a linotype printer. 
To chew gum in Mr. 
Hodge's room without his 
catching me (c) 

Football, 2, 3; Christmas 
Choir, 3 (d) 

FRANCES MATTHEWS 
Fran or Neenie 

Tish, tish and so what — 
why worry? (a) 

A farm in New Hampshire 
or a certain store in Lex- 
ington (b) 

To get a good position (c) 

Bowling, 1, 2 ; Baseball, 1 ; 
Honor Roll, 3; Commer- 
cial Club (d) 



CARMELO MEZZARINI 
Melo 

What are you going to do 

about it? (a) 
Hollywood (b) 
To be another "Bing" Crosby 

(c) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 
2 (d) 



DONALD MCCAUL 

Mac 
Maybe (a) 
Harvard (b) 
The same as everyone else 

(c) 

Basketball, 1, 2; Track, 2 

(d) 



HAZEL MACDONALD 

Haze or Mac 
Gee whiz, Honestly (a) 
Business School (b) 
To travel (c) 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 2 

(d) 




PHYLLIS MARY 
MCDONALD 

Pete or Phil 
I don't believe you! (a) 
Hawaii and Bermuda (b) 
To get to Hawaii within the 

next few years (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 2 (d) 



ESTHER MCGOWAN 

Maggie 

I don't know, why? (a) 

Burdett's Business College, 
Boston (b) 

To be whatever I try to suc- 
ceed in (c) 

Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 
2, 3; Archery, 1, 2, 3; 
Operetta, 3 (d) 



JOSEPH E. MCGUIRE 

Joe, Mac, Tom, Stooge, 

Lou 
Very clever. Oh, it is all right 

(a) 
"Hoppy" Butler's ranch in 

Texas ( b ) 
To hang from the "old apple 

tree in the orchard" (c) 
Class Basketball, 1, 2 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



BETTY ALICE MCKINLEY 

Bam or Micky 
Why:-- (a) 
Baltimore then Matenuska 

(b) 
To get there (c) 
Honor Roll, 2; Dramatic 

Club, 3 (d) 



DONALD MCPHERSON 

Heck 
That's my girl (a) 
A good position in a good 

firm (b) 
To become a happy married 

man (c) 



CHARLES MIGNOSA 
Dick 

Is that so? (a) 

Waltham (b) 

I would like to go to the 
Bentley Institution and con- 
tinue my study in account- 
ing so that I may become a 
C. P. A. (c) 

Baseball, Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3 (d) 



ROBERT C. MILLEN 
Dopey or Dimples 

Foo. Gee what a goon ! 
Well, abisinia (I'll be see- 
ing you.) (a) 

Around the world to see the 
sights. P. S. I hope to 
California (b) 

To succeed in anything I un- 
dertake to do. To become 
a success (c) 

Band, 2, 3; Royal Vaga- 
bond, 3 ; Christmas Carols, 
3 (d) 

LOUISE MILLEY 

Millie or Blackie 
Still love me? (a) 
Cambridge (b) 
To have other people see my 

point of view as well as 

their own (c) 






ii % *A 




GEORGE JOSEPH 
MCQUISTON 

Mac 

Hucker Keed (a) 

College (b) 

To beat Hacker in a hard 
contest (c) 

Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; Sr. 
Dance Comm., 3; Football, 
3; Band, 1, 2; Orchestra, 
2; Basketball, 1, 2; Honor 
Roll, 1; Dramatic Club, 2 
(d) 

JOHN MELE 

Johnny 

No-oo-oo! Is that right? (a) 

To go with Hacker and 
Howie on one of their ex- 
plorations for the H. F. U. 
Club (b) 

Go with Erickson some night 
when he has some money 
(c) 

Dramatic Club, 2; Varsity 
Basketball, 2, 3; Football, 
1; Class Basketball, 1; 
Cheer Leader, 1 ; Sr. Dance 
Comm., 3; Trade School 
Varsity Basketball, 1(d) ) 

MARIE MOGAN 
Tag 

Will you please let me e\'-' 
plain? (a) 

Wherever he is (b) 

To get a good position in an 
..Hue (c) 

Bowling, 1, 2; Commercial 
Club, 3; Baseball, 1 ; Hon- 
or Roll, 3 (d) 



RITA ANN MOGAN 

Friday or Mogie 
That will be the day ! (a) 
You never can tell where (b) 
To get a position in an office 

Nominating Comm., 2 ; Vice 

Pies. Commercial Club, ) ; 
Bowling, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; 

Archery, 1; Basketball, I; 

Volley Ball, 1; Honor Roll, 

1, 2, 3 (d) 

BETTY MONAHAN 

Bets 
It's catching (a) 
Switzerland (b) 
To be somebody's steneg (c) 
Archery, 1 ; Volley Ball, 1 ; 

Hockey, 2; Basketball, 2; 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



RUTH MOORE 
Toot 

Swell!,, -Hi- ya, fat! (a) 

Heaven ( ?-) (b) 

T,o write a best seller and go 
to Bermuda on the royal- 
ties vCc) 

"Mirror';' Staff, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



RAYMOND MORREALE 

Salesman Morreale ' 

I'm going to see. i Mae West 
(a) 

To go [ auound the world and 
collect samples^ (b) 

To, be a, movie camera opera- 
tor or a good salesman (c) 




▲ vta 



EILEEN MORRIS 
Red or Mickey 

Fiddlesticks (a) 

Massachusetts Art School (b) 

To be an artist (c) 

Commercial Club, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Hockey, 1, 2; 
Archery, 1; Baseball, 1; 
Honor Roll, 1, 3 (d) : 



JOHN MULREAN 

Tiger or Mul 
Cut it out, Leishman. Aw, 

you're crazy! (a) 
Waverley Naval Academy (b) 
To be Mimsie's boss, and a 

good stenographer (c) 



Basketball, 2, 



Commercial 



Club, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3 (d) 



JAMES L. MURPHY 

Jimmie, Murph, Moiphy 
Sneak (a) 
A good farm (b) 
To be a successful farmer 

( c ) - .,,, 

Class Basketball/ 3" (d) 



ROBERT E. NIMS 
Bob or Nimsie 

You're tkidding' me. Hi-ya, 
Charlie. Abstitively, posa- 
lutely (a) d 

Some business: office or med- 
ipal school (b) 

To become a doctor or man- 
ager ofr.F.' 'W. Woolworth 
(c) ■ 

Football, 3; Golf, 3 (d) 



HELEN NOONAN 
Lyn 

See you at Johnson's (a> 

The mountains with Barb C 
(b) 

To travel abroad (c) 

Cheer Leader, 2 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2"; Hockey, 1, 2, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2; Base- 
ball, 1, 2 (d) 




ALICE G. NOONE 

Sis 
Je ne sais pas (a) 
South Jaloppy (b) 
To soothe the "fevered brow" 

(to be a nurse) (c) 
Archery, 1; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 

3 (d) 



FRANCES NOONE 

Fran 
You can tell (a) 
Leslie School (b) 
To be a dietitian (c) 
Archery, 1; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 

3; Bowling, 1, 2 (d) 



ROBERT ARTHUR 
NOTTENBURG 
Jake, Bob 

I'll do it later (a) 

Harvard (b) 

Broadcasts, 1; Ass't. Adv. 
Mgr., "Mirror" 1 ; Ass't. 
Business Mgr., "Mirror", 
2; Student Mgr. Baseball, 
2, 3; Sr. Photographic 
Coram., 3 ; Dramatic Club, 
1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
Treas., 3; Bus. Mgr., "Mir- 
ror", 3 "Jade God" cast, 2; 
Dramatic Club Play Coram., 
3; Band, 1, 2; Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, {d) Activities 



r 



BETSEY E. NUTTING 
Beppy or Bets 

Hi ya? Love to F. (a) 

Colby Junior (b) 

To raise my dog collection 
from 100 to 1000 (c) 

Executive Comm. Dramatic 
Club, 2, 3; Secretary Dra- 
matic Club, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club Play Comm., 3 ; Sr. 
Play Comm., 3 ; Sr. Dance 
Comm., 3 ; Dramatic Club, 
1, 2, 3; North Jr. Alumni 
Dance Comm., 1, 2, 3 (d) 



ROBERT JUSTIN 
O'CONNELL 

Pesky 

That's understood (a) 

University of Southern Cali- 
fornia with my uncle (b) 

Go in business with Hack, S. 
C. To be in love (c) 

Football, 3 (d) 




CHESTER F. OHNEMUS 

Bud 
Yeah, me too! (a) 
Nowhere in particular. Just 

a home boy (b) 
To find Ken Trombley a job 

(c) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 

3; Baseball, 2, 3; Senior 

Dance Comm., 3 (d) 



FLORENCE ALICE 
ORECHIA 

Florrie 
Oh! I don't know! (a) 
Cambridge (b) 
To attend a business school 

(c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



CARL R. PALADINO 

Lefty 
Let me see (a) 
Anyplace. (A shot in the 

wild) (b) 
Advertising manager of a 

large concern (c) 
Football, 1 ; Jr. Prom Comm., 

2 ; Membership Comm., 3 ; 

Commercial Club, Honor 

Roll, 1 (d) 



MARY PALUMBO 

May or Mae 
I can dream — can't I? (a) 
To be "Flossie's" neighbor at 

Pride's Crossing (b) 
Make the Social Register (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field 

Hockey, 1 (d) 



MARY PATRICIA 
PARRELLA 
Mamie or Pat 

You know what. No kidd- 
ing (a) 

To travel around the world 
(b) 

Nurse (c) 

Operetta, 3; Basketball, 1, 3; 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Field 
Hockey, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; 
Volley Ball, 3 (d) 




T. PAR ELLA 



RUTH E. PECKHAM 

Pecky or Betty 
Well, it's like this (a) 
Who knows? (b) 
To tell that man what I think 

of him (c) 
Archery, 1; Bowling, 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 1 (d) 



PAUL H. PERIDIER 
Perry 

So what! (a) 

Northeastern University, Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts (b) 

To become a teacher (c) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



KENNETH PERRY 

Ken 
I've got a theory (a) 
Northeastern University (b) 
By rocket to the moon (c) 
Band, 1, 2; Orchestra, 2; 

Radio Club, 1 ; Honor Roll, 

1; Home Work, 1, 2, 3 

(d) 



MARGARET A. PHELAN 
Maggie or Marge 

Did I ever tell you? (a) 

boston School of Domestic 
Science (b) 

To see M. B. and a certain 
brown-eyed lad firmly es- 
tablished in a little white 
bungalow (c) 

Orchestra, 1, 2 (d) 




MARJORIE PIERCE 

Margie 
You better hadn't (a) 
Katherine Gibbs (b) 
To be a success in whatever 

I do (c) 
Senior Play, 3; Honor Roll, 

3; Archery, 1; Bowling, 1, 

2, 3; Dramatic Club, 3 

(d) 



LEO PORRETTI 

Rabbit 
Take your time. How do 

you do, Mr. — (a) 
There is a possibility of my 
going to an Agricultural 
College, (b) 
To become a success at what- 
ever I do (c) 

Jr. Prom Comm., 2 ; Foot- 
ball, 1 ; Inter Class Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



EDITH PORTER 

Dedith or Topsy 
Skip it. So what? (a) 
To take a trip around the 
world and have a souvenir 
from each country (b) 
To own a beauty parlor (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



GEORGE A. POTHIER 

2-E or Georgie 
Don't quibble. Why? That's 

trite (a) 
Qui sait? (b) 

To become a journalist (c) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Art Club, 1; 

Dramatic Club, 2 (d) 

BARBARA PRIDE 
Pridie or Scoop 

Know any news? (a) 

University of New Hamp- 
shire (b) 

To be a good teacher of Eng- 
lish and dramatics (c) 

Soph. Dance Comm., 1; Field 
Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1; 
Archery, 1, 2; Tennis, 1; 
Assembly pianist, Dramatic- 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Jr. Prom 
Comm., 2; "Mirror", 1, 2, 
3; Pres. Dramatic Club, 3; 
High School Reporter, 3; 
Dramatic Club Play Comm., 
2, 3; Sr. Play, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 




ARTHUR J. POWER 
Art or Hoss 

Make a note of that! (a) 

Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology (b) 

To be a successful business 
man and engineer (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; 
Nominating Comm., 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Edi- 
torial Staff of "Mirror", 1, 
2; Editor-in-Chief of "Mir- 
ror", 3 (d) 

DOROTHY ELIZABETH 
RAFUSE 
Dot or D 

Say now! (a) 

Heaven, I hope (b) 

To attend Chandler's Business 
School (c) 

Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Commer- 
cial Club, 3; Basketball, 1 
(d) 



OLIVE A. REGAN 

O or Olie 
Really? (a) 

To Hawaii in 1943 (b) 
To be a private secretary (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Dramat- 
ic Club, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Room Agent for 
"Mirror", 1, 2, 3; Dramat- 
ic Club Play, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



ELIZABETH M. REIDT 

Betty 
And it isn't even funny (a) 
Women's College at Nev 

Haven (b) 
Public School Music Teacher 

and Church Organist (c) 



LENARD RICHARDSON 
Lennie or Rich 

That's the spirit (a) 

Wentworth and then to see 
the world (b) 

To get ahead in the world or 
to join the U. S. M. C. To 
meet that certain girl (c) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Golf, (capt.- 
3), 2, 3; Sr. Dance Comm., 
3; Homework, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



BERNARD J. RISTUCCIA 



SALVATORE RISTUCCIA 

Fat 
Darn it (a) 
Foreman in a carpenter shop 

(b) 
Take a trip around the world 

(c) 



GAETANO RIZZO 
Tarnna or Gats 

Hello — Goodbye. Say hon- 
est (a) 

Any place where there is 
plenty of good air to 
breathe (New Hampshire, 
Vermont and Maine (b) 

To be an honest citizen (c) 

Football, 1, 2 (d) 




SEBASTIAN RIGOLI 

Busier 
Svienia (a) 
The Greeks (b) 
To take a trip to Hawaii (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



PHYLLIS RINES 
Toddy 

Much — Eh ! Supermella gor- 
geous (a) 

China and Japan (b) 

To be a surgeon in a Chinese 
hospital (c) 

Baseball, 1, 2; Hockey, field, 
3; Bowling, 1; Volley Ball, 
1, 2; Archery, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



SYDNEY ROSENBURG 
Syd or Rosy 

Foo, Hi ya, kid (a) 

Boston University Business 
(b) 

To become a professional mu- 
sician (c) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Sr. Play, 3; 
Dramatic Club, 2; Football, 
1; Orchestra, 2 (d) 



ALICE ROWE 

Red or Allit 
Hey, muy amigoes (a) 
A ranch in Southern Texas or 

Mexico (b) 
Reporter (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



FRANCIS ROWELL 

Cliff, Snowshoes, Turk 
Smarten up. Don't be a clown 

all your life (a) 
New York, Harlem (b) 
To get out of High School 

(c) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 

2, 3; Baseball, 2; Golf, 2, 

3 (d) 






Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



MICHAEL JOHN RUSSO 

Mike 
Grow up. Hucka Keed (a) 
Northeastern University 
To become a professional big 

league ball player (c) 



VIRGINIA R. ST. PIERRE 

Ginny 

So. what? (a) 

Europe (b) 

To get an easy position with 
plenty of money (c) 

Basketball, 1, 2; Hockey, 1, 
2; Baseball, 1, 2; Basket- 
ball Dance Comm., 1 ; Sr. 
Play, 3 ; Commercial Club, 
3 (d) 



BERTHA SALVUCCI 

; Bert or Birdie 
ITya, Beautiful (a) 
To cross the Atlantic (b) 
Private secretary to Peter 
Salvucci & Sons, Contract- 
ors (c) 
Sec. to "Mirror" Staff, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2y 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 2, 3 (d) 



CORA ELIZABETH SAN- 
DERSON 
Corky or Cocoa 

I see, now, and that'll be the 
day (a) 

Wherever I can find success 
(b) 

To get a position in an office 
(c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



JOSEPH H. SAN SOUCIE 

San 
What? I don't know (a) 
Print shop (b) 
To be a foreman (c) 
Student Council, 2 (d) 





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ALFONSO SALAMONE 

Fofo 
Where yah headed fer? Take 

it easy (a) 
To get a steady job (b) 
To hit the Sweepstakes (c) 



JAMES VINCENT SALA- 
MONE 

Dago, Barber, Jimmie, 
Butcher 

What a hot sketch. No kid- 
din'. So long (a) 

To go to Wilfred's Academy 
(b) 

To become a successful bar- 
ber and hairdresser some 
day (c) 

Class Basketball, 1, 2; Red 
Cross Agent, 2; "Mirror" 
Agent, 1, 2; Commercial 
Club, 3 (d) 

LENA S. SANTOLUCITO 
Leelow 

Holy umpin (a) 

Washington, D. C. and Ha- 
waii (b) 

To be a successful secretary 
(c) 

Commercial Club, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1 (d) 



DOROTHY E. SAVAGE 
Straws, Dot, or Did 
Why? (a) 

Ethiopia (b) 

To go to Europe (c) 



JOSEPHINE ROSE SCAFIDI 

Jo or Jo Jo 
You little squirt!' (a) 
Heaven only knows where! 

(b) 
To grow 12 inches (c) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 

Volley Ball, 3; Commercial 

Club, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



ARTHUR SCHEBECI 

Art or Bing 
True to a certain extent (a) 
California (b) 
To sing over the radio (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



THEODORE H. SCHO- 
FIELD 

Lee, Ted, Sco, Teddy 
Hi ya, Toot! Hey, Waffle 

Puss! (a) 
Heaven (??) (b) 
To own the controlling stocks 

in the W. W. Co. See 

"Smitty" run the B. A. A. 

marathon (c) 
Sr. Play Comm., 3; Safety 

Council Rep., 3; Football, 

1, 2, 3 (d) 




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ALBERT SCHWOTZER 

Al, Moose, Swatz 
I'll bite your ear off! (a) 
P. G., then Bellevue HospiUil 

(b) 
To sing "Celeste Aida" in 

the next operetta (c) 
Football, 1, 3; Operetta, 3 

(d) 



LAWRENCE JOHN SEL1G 

Laurie 
What's the story heah? (a) 
The South Seas and points 

South and West (b) 
To be a millionaire before the 

age of 50 (c) 
Track, 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader, 

3; Honor Roll, 1 (d) 



ARTHUR FRANCIS 
SHAUGHNESSY 
Shocks or Skip 

Get off the ear. Speak up, 
quiet one (a) 

To visit "Hoppy" Butler's 
ranch in Texas (b) 

To be a member of the Bos- 
ton Bruins Hockey Team 

(c) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 
2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Pic- 
ture Committee, 3 (d) 

HARRY SHELDON 

Harrison 
Good morning (a) 
Berkley's Accounting (b) 
Be successful in business (c) 
Baseball, 1 ; Sophomore Dance 
Comm., 1 ; "Mirror" Agent, 
1, 2; Honor Roll, 1; Jr. 
Prom Comm., 2 ; North Jr. 
Alumni, 2, 3; Chief Mar- 
shal at Class Day Exercises 
1937, 2; Usher at Gradua- 
tion Exercises, 2 ; Member 
of Alumni Comm., of Com- 
mercial Club, 3 ; Treas. 
of Commercial Club, 3; Sr. 
Play Usher, 3 (d) 

DOROTHY E. SHELIN 

Dot or Swede 
Oh, gee! Isn't that super- 

malla caduckeish? (a) 
Bermuda (b) 
To get there (c) 




FLORENCE ELIZABETH 

SHERIDAN 

Flossie, Flo, Sherry 
Where's my — Wait a min- 
ute. What? (a) 
Deaconess Hospital (b) 
To be a successful nurse and 

to specialize with small 

children's work (c) 
Sr. Play Comm., 3; Royal 

Vagabond, 3; Honor Roll, 

2 (d) 



ANITA MARIE SIMEONE 

Needles 
Listen! Tell me (a) 
California and Europe (b) 
Go to Boston and drop in to 

see every movie (c) 
French Play, 1 (d) 



JOHN SLOAN I: 
Dick 

Sherwood Music School, Chi- 
cago (b) 

To be a successful pianoforte 
teacher ( c ) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Orches- 
tra, 2 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) 



I es.iv.a /mi. 



(c) Ambition, {d) Activities 



ANN SMITH 

Giggles or Smitty 

I'll bite, what? (a) 

I wish I knew (b) 

To be a radio announcer (c) 

Red Cross Agent, 2, 3; "Mir- 
ror" Room Agent, 3; Dra- 
ma'.ic Club Play, 3; Senior 
Play, 3; Operetta, 3; Dra- 
matic Club, 3; Field Hock- 
ey team, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



EVERETT W. SMITH 

Smitty or Smythee 
Where's Ted! Hi! Huh! 

Yeah! Hey, Norn! (a) 
See the New York World 

Fair (b) 
Paper hanger or see Ted 

Schofield eat his 5th dish 

of macaroni (c) 
Committee Sr. Play, 3 (d) 



DORIS VIRGINIA STACY 
Dot 

You're telling me? (a) 

The road to success. Be hon- 
est, work hard, and keep 
happy (b) 

To become an efficient secre- 
tary (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



MICHAEL JOHN STATKUS 

Yogi 
Hey, S'ar (a) 
State House (b) 
T.elired business man (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



EDWARD C. STEARNS, JR. 

Ed or Stearnsie 
That's a good point (a) 
Tufts (b) 

To be a "better" engineer (c) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Editorial 

Staff of "Mirror", 1, 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 1, 3; Band, 1; 

Tennis, 2 (d) 




i * -dam - -*• *. 





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FREDERICK T. SMITH 

Smitty 
Any expression with Foo in 

it (a) 
M. I. T. and from there only 

time will tell (b) 
To become an aeronautical 

engineer and to see the 

world (c) 
Treas. Radio Club, 1; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2 (d) 



EDWARD SPENCER 

Spence or Eddie 
There'll come a day (a) 
Hop along Butler's ranch in 

Texas (b) 
To become a "pro" at a Tom 

Thumb golf course (c) 



BETTY STEVENS 
Stevie 

Really! Hi! (a) 

College (b) 

To teach physical education 
and dancing (c) 

Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; Hon- 
or Roll, 1; "Mirror", 1\ 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; Vol- 
ley Ball, 2 ; Tennis, 1 ; 
Archery, 1, 2; Field Hock- 
ey, 1, 2; Sr. Play, 3 (d) 

WILLIAM A. STEVENS 

Butch, Steve, Hefty 
Write it on the wall. Choke 

up (a) 
Bungytown Normal (b) 
Form partnership with Red 

Caminiti. Run 4 racks 

without scratching (c) 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

3 (d) 



HOWARD PARKER 

STRUM 
Howie or Hum 

Hucker Keed (a) 

College of Engineering North- 
eastern University (b) 

To graduate from Northeast- 
ern (c) 

Dramatic Club, 2 (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



RENO W. SWANSON 



PETER TAMULEWICZ 
Hurricane 

Can't tell yu. The man of 
the hour (a) 

Hawaiian Islands (b) 

Soldier of fortune — Air- 
plane pilot (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 




JOSEPHINE R. TARANTO 

Faylay 
Isn't he a honey? (a) 
S. S. Kresge (b) 
To be successful in whatever 

I attempt to do (c) 
Basketball, 1; Field Hockey, 

1; Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



ARTHUR E. THIBEAULT 

Tibb 
Shake my by the hand; 

You're a heck of a nice 

kid (a) 

U. S. Navy, Pacific fleet 

(b) 
To see the day that Daley 

brings his own lunch (c) 
Football, 1; Basketball, 2; 

Tennis, 2, 3; Commercial 

Club, 3 (d) 



FRANCIS THIBEAULT 

Frank 
Guess who? (a) 
Unknown (b) 
Aviation mechanic (c) 
Student Council, 3; Dance 

Committee, 2, 3 (d) 



ANNE THOMAS 
Tomrnie or Pandy 

What? (a) 

College (b) 

To get a good position and 
be able to travel (c) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; "Mir- 
ror" Staff, 1, 2, 3; Dramat- 
ic Club, 1, 2; Dramatic 
Club Play, 2; D. A. R. 
Representative from W. H. 
S., 3 ; Bowling, 1 ; Field 
Hockey, 1; Archery, 1, 2; 
History Medal from Sons 
of American Revolution, 2 
(d) 

MARJORIE M. THOMSON 
Tommy or Margie 

Oh my, oh my, oh my; you 
can tell (a) 

To travel the world over and 
to finally live in Scotland 
(b) 

To secure a steady, well-pay- 
ing position (c) 

Basketball, 1, 2; Volley Ball, 
1, 2; Hockey, 1, 2; Arch- 
ery, 1; Bowling, 1, 2; 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 




RALPH ALVIN THOMP- 
SON 
Tommy 

Second Tuesday of next week 
(a) 

Wide open spaces (b) 

Overcome my bashfulness (c) 



RUTH M. TIDMAN 

Ruthie or Happy 
No. I don't know (a) 
New Zealand (b) 
To be a successful secretary 

Senior Flay, 3; "The Royal 
Vagabond", 3; Christmas 
Carols, 3; Commercial 
Club, 3 (>1) 



MARY TORTORELLA 

May 

Oh! for Heaven's sake (a) 

Holland (b) 

To be in Japan during cher- 
ry blossom time (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (r) Ambition, (d) Activities 



PAUL TRACY 

Parson 
What's up, kid (a) 
To enter Burdett College (b) 
To become President of the 
United States of America (c) 



HARRY TRAINOR 

Spike 
Hey Butch! (a) 
Boston College (b) 
To be a member of the Wal- 

tham High Faculty (c) 
Inlra Mural Basketball, 3; (d) 




MARY UMBRELLO 

Snowball, Snowhite, 
Blackie 

Oh ! for goodness sakes, 
What's the matter now? 
(a) 

Anywhere where luck and 
money take me (b) 

Just to be a good secretary 
(When I get a job) (c) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 1, 2; Senior 
Play Cast, 3 ; Radio Broad- 
casts, 1 ; Honor Roll, 1 
(d) 



JOSEPHINE VANARIA 

Chick or T oe 
Say, hones/ a) 
California o see all the 

movie stars in person (b) 
To be a bookkeeper (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



ETTA VILES 

Oh, I don't know (a) 

New York's World Fair in 

1938 and Canada (b) 

To be a success in whatever 

I do (c) 
Commercial Club, 3; Bowl- 
ing, 3; Volley Ball, 1 (d) 



PEARL I. WALSH 



VIRGINIA WANBERG 

Jinny 
Well, what do you want to 

know now? (a) 
Heaven alone knows (b) 
To be the head of a clinic 

for crippled children. Also, 

to write best sellers (c) 
Literary Staff of "Mirror", 1, 

2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1; 



(d) 





* > t 





MARGARET WELLMAN 

Mickey or Magee 
Run up a tree. Oh ! my soul 

(a) 
Heaven or? (b) 
To own a beauty shop (c) 
Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1 

(d) 



KERMIT G. WELTON 

Doc 
P. G. then a pre-med. (b) 
A shingle on Beacon St. (c) 
Track, 1, 3; Honor Roll, 2; 

Senior Play Comm. (d) 



MARJORIE WETHERBEE 

Marjee or Maggie 

Don't forget to leave my 
lunch money, Pa (a) 

N°w York or Hollywood (b) 

To be Nelson Eddy's secre- 
tary (c) 

Dramatic Club, 2; Commer- 
cial Club, 3; Baseball, 1, 
2; Volley Ball, 2 (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 



CAROLINE WHEATON 

Carl, Carlie, Blondie 
I guess you don't know who 

I am! (a) 
To travel around the world 

(b) 
To be a success in whatever 

I choose (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1 (d) 



HERBERT W. WHEELER 

Slim 
What a hot "tomato" (a) 
Unknown (b) 
To become a success (c) 






RUTH WHITEHOUSE 
Bushy or Hon 

Let's have a romance, where's 
Don? How about a piece 
of pie? (a) 

Miss Colberth's Filing and 
Indexing School and Ha- 
waii (b) 

To be a stenographer and get 
married to a curly-haired, 
handsome man (c) 

Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hock- 
ey, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (d) 

EDWIN F. WHITNEY 

Ed or Tubby 
Prove it. Do you mean it? 

(a) 
United States Coast Guard 

Academy (?) ( b ) 
To go to college. To learn 

to play baseball well (c) 
Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 3; 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (d) 



DOROTHY WOODWARD 

Dottie 
Who do you think you are, 

anyhow? (a) 
Back to Chicago (b) 
To be a good secretary (c) 
Commercial Club; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2 (d) 



GEORGE HENRY 



WYMAN 




mito 



FLORENCE A. YOUNG 

Flossie or Jay 

Who'd ya say hi to, May? 

(a) 

Pride's Crossing (b) 

To make the Social Register. 
To get a job (c) 

Field Hockey, 1 ; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3 ; Baseball, 1 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 (d) 



NORMAN D. ROBINSON 
Limey, Tiger 

Why (a) 

Shows (b) 

Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology (c) 

To own a yacht (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (r) Ambition, (d) Activities 



JOSEPH AUCOIN 

Joe 
What are you going to do 

about it? (a) 
Florida (b) 

Baseball, Hockey, Basketbali 
Golf Pro (c) 

(d) 

MARJORIE BUDREAU 

Buddy or Marge 
So there, too (a) 
Florida (b) 
To get a good job (c) 
Volley Ball, 1; Archery, 1; 

Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



ADELINE B. CAMPBELL 

Diz, Noisey, Sleepy 
I didn't do it! No foolin' 

or nothin' ? (a) 
To have a "swing band" at 

Coney Island (b) 
To have someone build better 

roads to the "other" part 

of Waltham (c) 

JEANNETTE DUBE 

Jan 
What about it? (a) 
California (b) 
Secrelary to a movie producer 

(c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 



LENA FISH 
Lee 

Got something there (a) 

New York to see World's 
Fair (b) 

To be a success in later life, 
and get my silver "W" 
(c) 

Field Hockey, Class Team, 1 ; 
Volley Ball, Class Team, 
2; Room Agent of "Mir- 
ror", 2; Sr. Play Comm., 
3 (d) 

BETTIE FISHER 

Bettina, Bets, Feesh 
Sure, you know me. Hi 

cutie (a) 
Anywhere outside of U. S. 

Especially Switzerland and 

Bermuda (b) 
Be a perfect dancer and a 

good wife (c) 

DONALD AUSTIN HAR- 
VEY 
Curly, Don, or Slugger 

Straighten up kid, Let's take 
a stroll, Get creepy, will 
ya? (a) 

Northeastern University, He- 
bron Academy, Hawaii (b) 

Physical Education Teacher, 
coach of hockey and base- 
ball (c) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 
2, 3; Tennis, 1, 2, 2; Class 
Se:reary, 1; Football, 1, 2, 
3 (d) 



E. JUANITA PERROTT 
Perrie, Buck, Peaches, Babe, 
Bunny 

For Pete's sake (a) 

Massachusetts Art (b) 

To be a success in life and 
to go on a cruise through 
Panama Canal to South Sea 
Islands and up to Hawaii 
(c) 

Archery, 1 ; Baseball, 1, Bas- 
ketball, 1 ; Bowling, 1 ; 
Volley Ball, 1; Hockey, 2; 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3 (d) 

RAY M. KENNEY 

Butch 
Well, fan my brow (a) 
In some chemical testing and 

research laboratory (b) 
Become a chemist (c) 

SHERMAN MORRELL 

Deacon 
Hi ya, ^ud. Wot cha know? 

(a) 
Around the world visiting 

Germany specially (b) 
Make $50 a week (c) 

ETTA MAE NIES 

None 
I'll think about it! (a) 
Wherever a good position of- 
fers itself (b) 
To get a good position (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 (d) 

ELBERTA O'NEILL 

Birdie 
Surah, you've gotta (a) 
Miami (b) 
To become the best in any 

field I enter (c) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Destination, (c) Ambition, (d) Activities 




WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TFAM io*q 

M,dd " ^^s^^zs^^^r^- DoaM *■-» EfchMd j — — — 

*"*" &"*" " *"■*■» ""»- c °-%. ■*— u* P h „ ip c, mi „, ti> Rllpll Eagan> Chester 



Courtesy of Waltham News Tribune. 



BURDETT COLLEGE 



Courses for 

Young Men and Women 

Business Administration -Account- 
ing (Pace), Secretarial, Shorthand, 
Typewriting, Business, and Finishing 
courses. 

One and Two-Year Programs. 
Previous commercial training not re- 
quired for entrance. Leading col- 
leges represented in attendance. 
Students from different states. 



60. 



I / BEGINS IN 

tk near SEPTEMBER 



Write or 

telephone 

for Day or 

Evening 

Catalog 




QffL 
BUSINESS TRAINING 

needed to 

MAKE THE RIGHT START 

MOVE STEADILY FORWARD 

ACHIEVE SUCCESS 

(with a Degree Plan for those 
who wish it) 



an 



d in addit, 



con 



VOCATIONAL COUNSEL 

AND PLACEMENT 
— SERVICE 



1 56 STUART ST., BOSTON Telephone HANcock 6300 






Compliments of 



WALTHAM COAL CO. 

Established 1872 



"4 



V K»t >-«nfr< >-«■»-( ><■»< ivyil^uC*!! n-CEP-t i-^Ot m 









■K«»l)«»»«»l>«».l4 



CHINA 
DINNER WARE 



GLASS 
KITCHEN FURNISHINGS 



C. F. HUNT COMPANY 

Horace E. Wallis 



685 Main Street 
Waltham, Mass 



Tel. Wal. 2390 



»->.)4B-i'«»i.'-aB-i>-«B-iJ^O'^>l-^i»4 



D-rX>>)4»()4 



n i'^^t >-^»n«»< >« 



R. N. WALLINGFORD 
Optometrist 

Prescriptions carefully filled 



,, 



Gifts 



Greeting Cards 



Swedish 



Also 
French 



German 



Christmas Cards 
Telephone Waltham 1200 
, 5 MOODY STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 

( Pants, Trousers, Britches, Slacks, Pantaloons 

I Call Them What You Will 



WE HAVE THEM 

So don't Pant Around, Come to the S. tk J. Pant Shop 
A Store Devoted to Nothing But the 

Sale of Pants 

214 MOODY STREET - - Near Embassy Theatre Waltham 



PAUL B. SMITH, Co., Inc. 
Authorized Ford Dealer 

Telephone Waltham 4210 
838 MOODY STREET 



+ i>-m^tymmh<><mm-i>'^^-tn^B-t>-m .. 



t%i^O'^[)'^()«»l )^04D»II'^0^(.-^()^<)«»()«»(J«»()«»()^(V^()'^0^()«»( >-^»0-^B»<?-^»<>-«l»<).^».< >•«■•>< H 



B-<'-^»<J<^B».f>-»<n.^»(>- 



Ml^li^i 




LADIES *nd MENS 

FORM A B_ CLOTHES 
#Wf RENTAL 



JMtKA 



~WomtK6 



ILVU WI1»S 
101) C0KH1 

IWHV WBK1 



READ & WHITE 



11 SUMMER STRUT 
7ff.LIB.7930 



WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
GASPEC 34*7 




K)<BH>«BHMB»«»«»()^»l><i^<)<i^()«^i)-«^()'M»'( >•«■■•< >•«■»■<)-. 



M-WII4»li^O^II«»'i|^ll«»(H 






H. L. STONE DAIRY 

MILK — CREAM 

BUTTERMILK 

CHOCOLATE MILK 

DAIRY ORANGE 

.1295 MAIN STREET 

Telephone Waltham 0227 



u-mm-^-^m-ommtu-mm+iy'mmtKi-mm+uimm-o-wm+M-mm+o-^+u-mm-u-mim-i-i-m 



| f>o-^»-<>-«*-0-^»-0-««* 



■ )«D- >-«D l ().^<>^»O-^»()^»()<^»()^»C)^»()^»0^»n^»<)^»»^»0^»()^»<>^V'<><«»'<» 



Compliments of 

FRANCIS J. JOYCE 



■'HOO-f»i»'W»i)<»'»^0-l '^ '< 



t . 0< ^ w . n .^».,).^()^».()-1^0-^*(l*^l>^»-()^^*>«»'>^»-<»^»''>«»- ( »< 



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I I 

j Tel. Waltham>580 j 

HERBERT T. SPENCER Inc. | 

I I 

I Interior Furnishings j 

Custom made shades j 

I Fine cabinet work and upholstering | 

8 Draperies, floor coverings | 

Awnings, screens | 

708 Main Street Waltham, Mass. jj 

! _ _ ! 

! i 

! i 

!" WALTHAM I 

I I 

( WALL PAPER & PAINT CO. j 

Established 1905 ' 

a 

i 591-593 Main Street Waltham, Mass. 

f 

j WALtham 3732 L. Goldberg 

i i 

i m _ .__._._._._._ J 

! I 

Compliments of i 

I 

j ALLEN KNITWEAR STORES j 



BATHING SUITS f 



I 

Tantzen - Beachmade - Streamlined i 



WE CALL AND DELIVER] 



All Kinds Of Repairing, Pressing, Cleansing and Dyeing 
Fur Remodeling and Repairing a Speciality 



& 



I 

\ 361 Moody Street, Waltham, Mass. \ 

\ 
I 

\ 
j 

j ABEL MELANSON 

Tailoring For Ladies and Gentlemen 

5 Old Clothes Made to Look Like New 

c 

I 

I 11 Church Street Waltham, Mass. 

f 
f 



*<>-«_»- O •«■»-<> -^B»- > i-^K* <]•«»<>■«[> >■• »u-«C'i>-i^»-D-^».n-^».n-^»..i* 



►<> , ^» I >^^( t^m » >«»<>«»(>^»o«»o^w-o<^»o-^»o-a^t>«W'< >« 



* * >^a»().^B>(>-«^(i^BK>-o^a»-' >■««>< '*»»»'<a»o^B&u4=»»)^»»(>«».o-«ai'(>-^».i)-^»-«i-«».t).^H>.o.^».()-^mt >•«».. i«io-i:- 






JOSEPH H. O'NEIL 

Optometrist 

Office Hours 7 — 8 : 30 

Wed and Pri Eve. 8 : 30 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
Telephone Examination by Appointment 






KKBui^Hj^^ucnKi-snuj^a-u^^uc^ii-coiisaxioircrxj^ 



The Rhythm Barons 

'Sweet and Scintillating Swing" 
RICHARD ADAMS, Manager 
A\A Crescent St. Waltham 
Wal. 1431-R 






>'><n \ 



| CURTIS & CROSTON, INC. | 

! ! 

\ "Guaranteed Responsibility" \ 

[ 83 CHARLES STREET j 

! ! 

i BOSTON, MASS. I 

i i 

j LAF. 1033 WAL. 2616 j 

! I 

\ Storing Packing Moving j 



LA ROSA'S' MARKET 

"To Better Serpe the Public" 

120 WILLOW STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



Phone 0709 



Quality Service 






Mi«»i;«M)«»()a9<)«t<)«tnWi*t |l4VIM 



► O-MD-O-^W- <>-«■=»-(><: 





Compliments of the 



WALTHAM WATCH 



COMPANY 



- >-G3B- I-CT3- i«ID'<l'^' l «a-iJ-^n-^l,-^<|.Vt-u-^'>^»-<i<^-n«» l |- a »w-^ lJ «»^.^ n ,^ ll ^ 



»0<^»O^M-0<«»O^B»-l>«n»-<<X| 






^nj»i l ,^».i'i#'^(i«H*(H«»-()-«V[)-t>('-#»-o-gi»i"fae»l:i-^[)qEK)-q»-o-«»-"-g»i'- 



► 0«».<HB».()«»-n-J»-<)<3a"<i«H».0«£lyu.«3Ki.<=e>(, . t>(>-^»< >■«■»! i-^M-O- 



THE 



Original Candyland 
Shop 

475-477 Moody St. 
Waltham 

Hoot? MW^ Candies and Ice Cream 



E. E. BUTMAN CO. 



D. B. Whipple 



R. W. Daniels 



Pharmacists 

Telephone Waltham 0107 
Cor. Moody and Chestnut Sts., Waltham 



_J „ __ , j 



DR. CLEON F. HADLEY 
Optometrist 

Office: 333 MOODY ST., Room 205 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

Office Hours 9 A. M. to 6 P. M. 

Phone Waltham 1365 

House Waltham 2918-J 



Compliments of 

WOODWARD & TYLER 
Insure in Sure Insurance 

844 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 






»< >-»-<> ^m-o-^m-t >■« 






».<>-— -n-— •»>■« 






•O^M-0 •■■».< >■« 






+ 0'^m-i>-mn-n* 



^>4»<)H».^ 



*<>■»» >-«■»■ >«»0<«» •«»■<<>* 



I- 



HARRY A. STARR FUEL CO. 

"Serves You Right" 
Fuels to Meet AM Your Requirements 

Office 420 Moody Street, Waltham 

Telephone WALtham 0884 



L 



JENSEN JEWELRY COMPANY 
Diamonds, Jewelry, Watches 

(Cor. Spruce Street — up stairs) 
333 Moody Street Waltham, Mass. 



Compliments of 



CENTRAL SQUARE SHOE REPAIRING 



7 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



■mm-<-mm*-<-v»-<'-^^-->-^^<'-^^' <^m->-^^- >4a»i -^». -w*. «m> ^^-^' *a» i«»<i^»<i <^» 4H»ii.^»i >^»<<>«M»><>«»t>-^»< -■ ^»i)^».D«B»<0-«^<><^»<>^»n4^»i>«»M I 



-:!■•»-..-»•*- ( >-OB»( >'^^l >-W»i i-W»" i<^M<- >-^W-l l«»l ■ 



Compliments of 

JOHN F. ROBERTS 



WALtham 0109 



Est. 1933 



»(i^o«»<)«»i)^()^(i«»(i^<).«»0«»(:^(H 



*(>«»(>^^<l«»0«»Cl-«»0^»<>^B»(>-^»ci«»ll^^(>«'.)^^(>4H»f>-^^-"-^»<(>4^»-H<-*»-<>f * * 



M'^^(l«»IH^O«»(H 



»()^0^()«»()«»()«»0'^()4»()^()«»0'^(]«»««»(t^()«»(l«»0^()1»<)4 



WALTHAM MOTOR CO. 

400 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

Authorized Dealei 

Cadillac — Pontiac — LaSalle 
Sales — Service 



ADRIAN SMITH 

Formerly Supt. for Lewandos 

Custom Cleaner 

848 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 4529 



i l)«»04»< 



I 

I 

o 

I 

! 
I 

i 



— j 



MOODY & REGAN 
Printers 

621 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 1111 -W 



NEWALL COMPANY 

Wall Paper, Paint, Linoleum, 
Window Shades 

107 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 1824 



H)«KI'«»(J«K)1^o4Hl^»iJ-«Kl«»('<»n-«.!^ 



^•^■••"••^••"^"■•"■•"■•''•■^ 






»u. m . l >«»ii-«»i<^n.«»(i«|. <l 4 



-..■*»..<! V 



u 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



U 



MIDDLESEX ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 
A Complete Electrical Store 

689 MAIN STREET, WALTHAM 
Tel. Wal. 0437 



TYPEWRITERS 

All Makes - - Royal — Underwood 
Remington — Corona — L. C. Smith 

Sold Rented Repaired 

Typewriter Service Shop 

404 Moody Street Waltham 3133 



Compliments of 



MR. W. H. NICHOLS 









^O«»l)^0«»0« 



^<l'<^l>«»<l<« 



»0^»0^»0^»(1^»C)«»0«»|A 



,,__ . , , O — _™-„ -. ,_,-,, . _-*_, ,_ T | 



i 

! PROSPECT PARK j 

J J 

j l Florist j 

1 STANLEY ANDREWS, Proprietor 

j Tel. Wal. 4517 

182 Dale Street Waltham j 

i. a 

I 

i 






i 



i 



i 



! FAULKNER'S I 

! j 

j Opp CITY HALL — — MAIN ST. j 

1 i 

j "The Interesting Store" 

'| "Where The Recollection of Quality Remains Long 

j After The Price Is Forgotten" 

I Tel. Wal. 3114 

i 

i ! 

i ' 

i 

! 

! PAUL'S LUNCH 

! 

641 MAIN STREET, WALTHAM I 

! I 

I "Where the Customer is Right Sometimes" \ 

i 
i 
i 
i 

i 
j 

* Compliments of I 

! 

I CENTRAL MOTOR TRUCKING 

i 

I Moving and Trucking 

! 85 CENTRAL STREET WAL. 1539 j 

i 
I 



\ 



a 

I 

= 

I 

i 



a 

I 



i 
I 

i &nberston = Jflortst 

i 

i 210 MOODY STREET Waltham 1843 

i 

i 

f 

i 

r -,_._.« 

TASTY LUNCH 

S. D. AHARONIAN, Proprietor 

Fried Clams, Italian Spaghetti, 

Chops and Steaks 

Daily Specials 

692 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



JOE ROONEY'S 
Men's Shop 

I 485 MOODY STREET 



i 



L 



Opp. High St. 



Compliments of 

BENNET R. O'NEIL 
Prescription Optician 

Opposite Public Library 

WALTHAM, MASS. 
742 MAIN STREET 






ELM SPRING FARM 
"Insist on the Best" 

390 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 2313 



. — - ,. — — .. 1M . .. TTM . .. .„, .. mn .. ^j- .. ., — ,..— ,,— — . . — — .....—-., .^—.,..—^,,-^—.,,. J ^—. J , ,,.^_„ J ^- L .,.^_ J ..^^.., J ^^.... J . 



Schnapp's Chocolate Shop 

You will not know the BEST until you have had 
SCHNAPP'S 
83 Brown Street 
Tel. WALTHAM 1138-M 



i 
i 



I •0<«ak<>4^<)<«M'0-«a»-(l4W*-<t4e»0«M |( 



km*» !>-«■»•< >-«k.<>.« 



J. J. MURRAY 
Optometrist 

Mercantile Building Rooms 6 and 7 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 1128-M 



THE 

JVtnertcan Superior 

SHOE REBUILDING CO. 

Men's — Boys' Shoes and Rubbers 

Ed. L. Provencher, Proprietor 

705 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



*■■ -CMH i« » "-t 



>-l)'0»o«M<)4 



»0^0«»l)^0«M)«>(>^0^()«B-0^l)«»()«»0^:)^()^0^O^0^(H^0^0^()^t)«»l>.^(>4»()^(»;* 



Compliments of 

KAY JEWELRY CO. 

389 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



Compliments of 



QUINN FURNITURE CO. 



915-917 MAIN ST. 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone Waltham 0690 



BETTER BUY BUICK 

New and Used Cars 

The very best of service on all 

makes 
WALTHAM BUICK CO. 

703 MAIN STREET 

Opp. Waltham Savings Bank 

A. R. Kittredge, President 

Tel. Waltham 4806 or 4807 






-^w-n-c^B-n-or a 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



»"-«»<>-^»"'^»"'^»<>'^»"-^»<>^»<>'^»<>-^»<>-«»"-*»"-^»n-^»f>-«a»n-^»o«>(>'^»<>-^»(>.^»u-«M»<><a»n-^»o<^»o-a 



Autographs 



Autographs